Cuong Nhu Oriental Martial Arts

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About Cuong Nhu[edit]

Cuong Nhu was founded in Hue, Vietnam in 1965 by Grand Master Ngo Dong. Cuong Nhu Oriental Martial Arts Association is a federally recognized non-profit educational organization. Cuong Nhu is a martial art that blends the basic elements of a number of different styles. Cuong Nhu has its roots in Shotokan Karate and combines aspects of Aikido, Judo, Wing Chun, Vovinam, Tai Chi Chuan, and Boxing. It is this blending of hard and soft styles from which Cuong Nhu (pronounced Kung New) derives its name, which is Vietnamese for Hard (Cuong) - Soft (Nhu).

Cuong Nhu was brought to the United States in 1971, when Grandmaster Ngo Dong came to the University of Florida to earn his Ph.D. While there he founded the Cuong Nhu Karate Club. This club quickly grew into the largest intramural clubs on campus, with over two hundred students participating. Another school, the Center, was then established in Gainesville to serve people of all ages outside the university community. Many of the early students from these schools went on to establish their own Cuong Nhu dojos after leaving Gainesville, thus spreading the style all over the United States and around the world. Grandmaster Ngo Dong was succeeded by his son, Grandmaster Quynh Ngo as the Head of Cuong Nhu Oriental Martial Arts.


Tiger Dojo[edit]

Tiger Dojo was founded at Clemson University in the fall of 1992 by Sensei Bryant Wilson. The school was handed over to Sensei Stephen Mynhier in January of 1997 when Sensei Bryant moved to Richmond, Virginia. In 1999, Sensei Stephen handed the Dojo over to Sensei Darius Jones, who is the current head instructor. Club dues are $20 per semester, and national dues are $35 per year.

In September of 2002 Sensei Darius Jones started Crescent Moon Dojo in Pendleton, SC as a branch school of Tiger Dojo. While Tiger Dojo was primarily for Clemson students and faculty, Crescent Moon was started as a dojo for the members of the surrounding communities.

Tiger Dojo is currently home to more than 25 students and several instructors. A typical class consists of bowing in, a 15-20 minute warm-up, an hour of instruction in forms (kata) or self-defense principles, followed by bowing out.

External Links[edit]