1975

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1975 in Clemson History

Events in 1975[edit]

  • Final year of operation for the university-hosted barber shop in the basement of the YMCA. It now serves as the office of the Clemson Engineering And Science General Engineering Lab supervisor.
  • First commercial video game appears on campus when Atari Pong machine is installed in the Canteen under the Loggia. Engineering students in Rhodes Engineering Research Center had been playing Space War (in circulation among national computer nerds since at least 1971) on lab computers for quite some time (which would later appear commercially revamped as Asteroids, the last game with a black & white monitor). And the primitive game Land LM, simulating a moon approach, had been on the Clemson system for some time, as had Star Trek, using an 8x8 grid scanner field, both playable in the computer lab in Martin Hall's O-section. This was later rewritten in 1976 by Clemson Math major John Robert "Bob" Bane, of Spartanburg, to a 10x10 grid. Bane is Class of 1977.
  • Po Folks restaurant opens in Seneca.
  • Winter 1975: Herb Chanell opens Chanelo's Pizza on College Avenue and offers first on-campus delivery. Small controversy ensues as the university tries to accommodate changing trends relating to businesses selling on campus. An October 1972 policy requires enterprises to seek written approval from the Office of Student Affairs.
  • Winter 1975: The Clemson Pedalers bicycle club is formed on campus.
  • January 16: As second speaker in series "Perspectives on American Violence and Aggression", famed film director Sam Peckinpah appears in Daniel Auditorium, lecturing on "Violence Brings a Message".
  • January 20: Need for a new distribution policy is made obvious by a near riot that occurs in the Loggia during handing out of tickets for the upcoming Maryland basketball game to be played on January 22. Glass windows at the ticket window are pushed in by the surging crowd but fortunately no injuries are recorded. Classic TAPS annual photo of the crowd shooting the bird at the photographer during this jovial-if-jammed ticket distribution can be found on page 620 in the Epilogue section of the 1975 edition of TAPS, Volume 65.
  • January 21: Sponsored by the Christian Science Organization at Clemson University, Charles Ferris presents a lecture-discussion explaining the Christian Science philosophy.
  • January 22: Margaret Bradley Poole, widow of former Clemson President Robert Franklin Poole, dies at her daughter's home in Sumter. She was founder of the Clemson University Women's Club and the Beta Theta chapter of Delta Delta Delta sorority.
  • January 22: The Clemson basketball team breaks three-year jinx in play with the ACC Big Three opponents (Maryland, N.C. State, and North Carolina), upsetting the third-ranked Terps, 83-82, in front of record crowd of 11,800 in Littlejohn Coliseum.
  • January 23: Long-lived radio show "Sporttalk" first broadcast on WSBF-FM.
  • January 24: The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Robert Shaw with piano soloists Yarbrough and Cowan perform in Littlejohn Coliseum.
  • January 27: The National Players present free performances of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part I in Tillman Auditorium at 3:30 and 8 p.m. Local Pepsi-Cola distributor, the Terry Bottling Company of Anderson, begins offering limited edition Pepsi bottles inscribed with Undefeated 1974 Home Football Season record. Sold only in Anderson, Pickens and Oconee Counties.
  • January 27-January 29: The U.S. Navy recruiting office from Columbia, South Carolina flies into the Oconee-Clemson Airport with their Beech T-34B Mentor trainer, BuNo 143996, c/n BG-303, side number 016, to give demonstration rides to potential Navy candidates. They set up a table in the Loggia.
  • January 31: The Student Union presents Hydra in concert in Tillman Auditorium at 8 p.m. - tickets are $2 for students, $3 for the general public. Rock Mountain is opening act.
  • February 5: The Mad Mountain Mime Troupe performs in Daniel Auditorium at 8 p.m.
  • February 5-February 8: The Clemson Little Theatre presents the Edward Albee play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in the Food Industries Auditorium. Admission is $2.50 for adults, $1 for students.
  • February 6: Stanley Kubrick's cold war black comedy Dr. Strangelove : Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying And Love the Bomb is shown free in Tillman Auditorium at 8 p.m. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgHSDa2Jwqc&NR=1
  • February 8: Central Dance Association presents one heckuva show in Littlejohn Coliseum. Bonnie Bramlett (of Delaney and Bonnie & Friends fame) opens, followed by R.E.O. Speedwagon with headliners Lynyrd Skynyrd, all for $5.25 (advance), $6.25 for floor.
  • February 11: The Lenox String Quartet, artists-in-residence at the State University of New York, perform a program of Haydn, Bartok and Brahms in Tillman Auditorium at 8 p.m., presented by the University Concert Series.
  • February 12: Speakers Bureau presents psychologist and $64,000 Question quiz show winner Dr. Joyce Brothers in Tillman Auditorium at 8 p.m. (Her chosen area of expertise on the quiz show was baseball).
  • February 19: The Tiger staff honors Nancy Jacobs Qualls with a Timex watch as she edits her 50th issue, the first editor to reach this number. Volume LXVIII, Number 20 is published on February 21.
  • March: Tiger Rags, "Clemson's only complete jean shop," opens in the University Square Shopping Mall. Phone 654-6576.
  • March 21: Tates Locke is let go as basketball coach amidst NCAA investigation into his recruiting practices. He is not technically "fired" as his contract with the university has expired. He had been hired in 1970. An expected athletic department house-cleaning, given the extensive list of abuses, stops at one, however.
  • March 28: "Looking back on his term as president of the student body, Reggie Brantley 'counts the year as a success.' Brantley will turn over the office of president to Reggie Foster Monday", (March 31, 1975), reports news editor Debbie Graham Dunning in The Tiger, March 28, 1975, Volume LXVIII, Number 23, page 2. "Brantley feels the biggest contribution his administration made to the student body is the establishment of the Steering Committee and the Conferences on Leadership and Communication. 'The potential of the Steering Committee for generating change cannot be underestimated,' Brantley said. He said the conference has great potential for helping the student body because it brings students and administrators together to exchange ideas and discuss University problems."
  • March 29: President Gerald Ford signs Proclamation 4360, Terminating Registration Procedures Under Military Selective Service Act, eliminating the registration requirement for all 18-25 year old male citizens.
  • April 15-April 20: The Clemson Players, in cooperation with the Dionysia Council, present Eugene Ionesco's The Bald Soprano and The Lesson in Daniel Auditorium at 8 p.m., with free admission.
  • April 16: The Clyde Beatty - Cole Bros. Circus performs on the YMCA field at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.
  • April 16: Renown trial lawyer F. Lee Bailey speaks in Tillman Auditorium in final Speakers Bureau presentation of the semester.
  • April 16: After months of delays, the university accepts the newly-completed Fike Center. Intramural Director Banks McFadden announces that the new pool facility will open to students the following week.
  • April 18: The Union presents Jerry Rockwood as Edgar Allen Poe in Tillman Auditorium at 8 p.m. Admission is a buck. At the Tiger Band banquet, held at the Holiday Inn on the US 123 By-pass, C. Mark Sublette scores the Hartzog Award.
  • April 18-April 19: New York pianist Michael Lewis appears in The Gutter, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m., donation is 50 cents.
  • April 19: The Library Club, a private nightspot, opens on US 123 By-pass across from the train station, and immediately east of Lamar's. Manager is Charles "Spoon" Huggins. For the next year or so it will become very trendy among students to carry a "Library Card".
  • April 19: With the aid of a special grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission, the Union presents The Paul Winter Consort in Tillman Auditorium at 9 p.m., admission is $2.
  • April 19: The Union sponsors the Third Annual Bengal Ball at the Y Beach. Admission is $2.99, with music performances by the Mission Mountain Wood Band with Brothers and Sisters.
  • April 20: The Union presents a free outdoor concert and sale of student crafts on Bowman Field. Performing musicians are classical jazz guitarist Ed Williams, with Boogie Bluegrass, 2-7 p.m.
  • April 20: Marx Brothers movie At the Circus presented in the Amphitheatre at 9 p.m. - free admission.
  • April 21: The newly completed Fike pool opens to student use for the first time.
  • April 21-April 25 - TAPS is distributed in A-lounge of Johnstone Hall.
  • April 24: The Clemson University chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, is established. An affiliate of the American Psychological Association and a member of the Association of College Honor Societies, Psi Chi honors academic achievement and fosters a congenial climate for the creative development of the discipline for all members of the campus community.
  • April 26: Santana, led by guitarist Carlos Santana, performs in Littlejohn Coliseum http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzE2RApyyu4&feature=related with opening act, U.K. art-rock band, The Strawbs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ_qjPHVL-Y&feature=related Tickets are $4.25 for general admission and $5.25 on the floor for the first 1,500 sold. After that, prices rise to $5.25 and $6.25. Show starts at 8 p.m.
  • April 26-April 27: The third annual Blue Ridge Invitational Art Festival is held on the grounds of the Clemson House featuring 56 artists and craftsmen from North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Over $1,400 in prizes are awarded.
  • The Winn-Dixie on College Avenue closes as a new store is built on the US 123 bypass, later Tiger Boulevard. Walking to the store and carrying one's groceries home to the campus pretty much died with this change - trend towards more student vehicles on campus continues. Long-time College Avenue fixture Martin's Drugs closes after 68 years in business.
  • Spring: Pat Belew, proprietor of Pat Belew's Gold Nugget on Sloan Street, opens a second operation, Pat Belew's Hotdog Stand, on College Avenue.
  • Circa June: Prog rock band Ambrosia releases self-titled first album, produced and engineered by Alan Parson's, which yields up hit "Holdin' On To Yesterday" and WSBF-FM staple "Nice, Nice, Very Nice" with lyrics taken from Kurt Vonnegut's novel "Cat's Cradle". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAxPLoFedQo
  • June 26: Life Trustee Edgar A. Brown dies.
  • 1975: President Gerald Ford signs Proclamation 4360, Terminating Registration Procedures Under Military Selective Service Act, eliminating the registration requirement for all 18-25 year old male citizens.
  • Summer: The university motor pool takes delivery of 77 1975 Ford LTD sedans and 20 1975 Plymouth Gran Furies for use as university vehicles. They will serve until replaced between late summer and late fall of 1979.
  • Late summer: The former Winn-Dixie is remodelled into the short-lived night spot, The Grocery. A Hardee's restaurant, operated as a franchise by Spartan Food Systems, homebased in Spartanburg, South Carolina, opens on the Old Greenville Highway across from the Tiger Band practice field.
  • August 1: The date before which Clemson's erstwhile former basketball Coach Tates Locke had been restricted from off-campus recruiting by the NCAA the previous fall for the violation of offering a player's mother personal transportation.
  • August 17-August 18: The planned repainting of the paws project by Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity is cancelled after publicity back-fires, state highway department forced to adhere to laws as written which forbid such activity on state roads, even if Highway Commissioner and Clemson grad Silas Pearman (1955) is actually sympathetic. Previously they had "looked the other way." Paws on campus are renewed, however. An item by Mary C. Whittle on page 9-D of The State newspaper reports on August 14 that the South Carolina Highway Department has scotched the repainting.
  • September 5: Outstanding Clemson athletes, basketball player Skip Wise and baseball All-American Denny Walling accept professional contract offers and depart the university. A cartoon is drawn for the front page of The Tiger by ClemsonWiki contributor Mark Sublette showing the jocks leaving Jervey Athletic Center with currency sifting out of their bags.
  • September 7: It is officially announced that Clemson will compete in women's basketball in the 1975-1976 season. Mary Kennerty is named head coach. Clemson officials announce that the school will elevate women's swimming to varsity status. Coke Ellington is announced as the team's first coach. ("Clemson: Where The Tigers Play", by Sam Blackman, Bob Bradley and Chuck Kriese, Sports Publishing, L.L.C., 2001, pages 130, 166).
  • September 9: Student government elections held on campus.
  • September 12: The Board of Trustees meets in Sikes Hall at 9 a.m. Second annual First Friday Parade, this year named "Dam the Wave" in recognition of first game opponent, the Tulane Greenwaves. The Union holds the Blast Tulane Beer Bust at the Y Barn with a live band, the Anderson Redding Company. Admission is two bucks, beginning at 8 p.m.
  • September 13: Clemson drops the home opener to Tulane, 13-17.
  • September 14: Wildwater Unlimited Rafting Trip on the Chattooga River leaves from the parking lot in front of Mell Hall, 8 a.m. Free Flick at the Y Theatre features Mutiny on the Bounty and Jane Eyre, beginning at 8 p.m.
  • September 16: Student government run-off elections are held.
  • September 20: Clemson roadtrips to play at number 14-ranked Alabama night game. Tiger fans begin to drink heavily by halftime as Jim Phillips broadcasts the 0-56 debacle over WFBC radio. A bumper sticker circulating that week that reads "The Day the Tide Died" is seen altered to either "The Day the Tigers Died" or "The Day the Tide Died Laughing".
  • September 20: Kenny Loggins & Jim Messina perform in Littlejohn Coliseum, at 8 p.m. Tix are $4.50 for general admission and $6.25 for floor, available in Harcombe and Schilletter dining halls and at the Union during the afternoon.
  • September 23: The Tigers soccer team is ranked number one, according to the ISAA poll, for the first time in the school's history.
  • September 27: Clemson loses to Georgia Tech in Atlanta, 28-33.
  • Fall: This will be the last year in Clemson football history in which no games are televised. Starting in 1976, no fewer than two Tigers gridiron efforts will be aired annually, an unbroken string through 2008.
  • Fall: Red Parker's Ice Cream Parlor opens in the remodelled Texaco gas station, later barber shop, building at the tip of the intersection of the Old Greenville Highway and College Avenue. Football team experiences a jolly 2-9 season.
  • October: Electric Light Orchestra releases "Face The Music" album, and opening instrumental, "Fire On High" becomes a staple of WSBF programming for several years, used behind station i.d.s and promo spots. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14Hy6rDahuQ
  • October 4: The Tigers lose at Georgia, 7-35.
  • October 6: Departed Clemson basketball Coach Tates Locke's reputation unwinds as recruiting violations (automobiles, I'll pay yo' Mama's rent) find the NCAA placing Clemson on three years' probation, thereby hobbling Clemson outstanding 7'1" talent Wayne "Tree" Rollins final college play prospects.
  • October 11: Clemson beats Wake Forest in Memorial Stadium, 16-14. The very first show of NBC's Saturday Night airs, hosted by George Carlin.
  • October 14: The Clemson University Concert Series presents the Garde Republicaine Band of Paris, directed by Roger Boutry, touring in honor of the American Bicentennial, in Littlejohn Coliseum at 8 p.m., tour managed by Columbia Artists.
  • October 18: The Tigers travel to Duke, lose, 21-25.
  • October 25: Clemson hosts N.C. State but loses, 7-45.
  • October 31: The Buzzard is published as an eight-page edition. Front page headlines "Creeping buildings claim Deadwords" and "Fire department fiddles while Clemmons burns".
  • November 1: Florida State comes to Clemson, kicks butt, 7-43.
  • Early November: William B. Barlage, Jr., a professor at Clemson since 1958, is named new head of the Chemical Engineering Department.
  • November 8: The Tigers travel to North Carolina and win, 38-35. In South Bend, Indiana, this date, Daniel E. "Rudy" Ruettiger sacks the quarterback of the Georgia Tech Yellowjackets in the second of his two career plays on behalf of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. His experiences will be made into the 1993 film "Rudy".
  • November 14: Captain Frank Johnstone Jervey officially retires from his life trustee position on the board of trustees.
  • November 15: The Tigers lose to Maryland in Death Valley, 20-22. Central Dance Association presents The Clemson Bluegrass Bonanza in Littlejohn Coliseum at 8 p.m. with tickets running $3.50 for general admission or $4 on the floor for students, $4.50 for the public. Performers include II Generation, Betty Fischer, Dixie Bluegrass Band and Palmetto Bluegrass Band. Lack of a "name" headliner causes ticket sales to fall flat, however.
  • November 22: South Carolina triumphs over the Tigers in Columbia, 20-56. Clemson has a 2-9 season, 2-3 in conference, for fifth in the ACC.
  • November 25: The Clemson University Chamber Music Series presents a performance by soprano Doris Hill and tenor Robert Hill at 8 p.m. in Daniel Auditorium. A program of Seinard Bernstein's song-cycle "I Hate Music", a group of Negro spirituals, is offered.
  • December 3: The Clemson University Concert Series presents Gingerbread Productions, LTD.'s staging of 1776 in Littlejohn Coliseum at 8 p.m; music and lyrics by Sherman Edwards, book by Peter Stone, from a concept by Sherman Edwards. Tour direction by Ken Olsen and Jackie Schrock.
  • December 6: The Clemson Women's Basketball team plays its first game, a 55-51 win over Davidson.
  • December 20: Marshall Tucker Band's first song to enter the Top 40, "Fire On The Mountain", charts this date, will reach number 38 in its fortnight stay. (Whitburn, Joel, "The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits", Billboard Publications, Inc., New York, 1985, ISBN 0-8230-7518-4, page 204.)
  • What with the multiple sports struggles of a corrupt basketball coach and a 2-9 football season, and the still top-heavy male to female student ratio on campus, 1975 ended as one of the low morale periods in Clemson history (except perhaps for the highly-sought after coeds.)



1974 The 1970's 1976