October 9

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October 9 in Clemson History

Events on October 9 in Clemson's History[edit]

  • 1897: Clemson takes on the University of Georgia for the first time in a game played in Athens. The Tigers are blanked, 0-24.
  • 1907: Clemson blanks first-time opponent Maryville, 35-0, in game played in Clemson.
  • 1909: Clemson defeats Davidson in match played in Charlotte, North Carolina, 17-5. Tigers lead series, 4-2-1.
  • 1915: The Tigers eke out a 3-0 win over Tennessee in Knoxville, the Volunteers' first loss since 1913. "When the result of the last quarter of the game was announced in the mess hall the reaction was, chemically speaking, of explosive violence. Everybody whooped, danced, yelled, shook hands, slapped backs, screamed, and whistled, and did everything else that wasn't bad. Even Major Carwile lost his dignity and cut loose - the most striking illustration imaginable. After some minutes of this procedure, Dr. Riggs came down and, by the aid of a bugler, got things quiet long enough to say that a bonfire might be included in the celebration. No sooner had he gone than the companies were marched out (went out) and the fire started in earnest. Barrels, boxes, sticks, planks, and anything that would answer the purpose was carried and thrown on the pile on Bowman field. Boys (and some faculty members) were coming and going from this pile like ants running errands from their mound until everything available was in place. Then a couple of youths climbed to the top and emtied ten gallons of kerosene. Next a match, and the flames were soon lapping and flapping high into the night, to the ripping, tearing music of the band. The crowd grew even more hilarious when the 'big ring' was formed and the organized singing, yelling, and night shirt parading was started. Not until long roll at ten o'clock were the flames left to die alone." (The Tiger, "Cadets Celebrate Tennessee Victory", Tuesday 12 October 1915, Volume XI, Number 4, page 2.)
  • 1920: The Tigers beat Wofford, 13-7, on Riggs Field.
  • 1942: On October 8, 28 members of the football team, Coach Howard, a photographer, a manager and a trainer depart Clemson by train for Boston at 10 p.m. "Friday morning, [October 9, the football team] was awakened early and asked to hurry dressing as it was almost time to get off the train. Looking out the window and seeing no lights, the boys supposed they were either still in the country or in a black-out, but they were surprised to learn that they were only passing through the Hudson river [sic] tunnel and entering 'Little Old New York.' The train pulled into Pennsylvania Station about 6:30, where breakfast had already been prepared for the party in the station cafe. After breakfast the boys had just enough time to see a few such places as the Empire State Building, George Washington Bridge, the capsized Normandie, and Times Square. At 9 o'clock the team boarded a day coach for Boston. Necks were pretty sore from then on as they stretched to see the ships and unusual sights in the harbors of the old New England towns. The boys were getting pretty tired of riding when they arrived in Boston at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon. After they had been assigned rooms in the Hotel Kenmore, Coach Howard took the players out to Fenway Park for an hour's workout to get rid of their 'train legs'. A large number of sports writers and fans were on hand to look the Tigers over, to take pictures, and to make predictions. Dinner was served in the magnificent Embassy Room of the hotel and after a walk, the team retired early in preparation for the hard day ahead." (The Tiger, "'Tiger Team Enjoys Week-End Ball Trip To 'Yankee-Land' ", Thursday 15 October 1942, Volume XXXVIII, Number 5, pages 4-5.)
  • 1948: In a road trip, Clemson defeats the Mississippi State Maroons, 21-7, at Scott Field, State College, Mississippi. "An underdog Clemson team that was supposed to lose by two touchdowns stopped the famed Shorty McWilliams cold and downed a favored State eleven. Tom Salisbury scored the first Bengal touchdown by blocking a McWilliam's [sic] punt. The other scores came on passes from [Bobby] Gage to [John] Poulos and [Ray] Mathews, the latter covering sixty yards. Jack Miller added the three extra points. State's only score came by virtue of a recovered fumble and a pass." (TAPS, Volume XXXIX, 1949, page 402.)
  • 1970: To launch Homecoming weekend, Central Dance Association offers up the Ike And Tina Turner Review, with opening act Willie Tee and the Hot Rain at a casual dress concert in Littlejohn Coliseum. Admission is $3.
  • 1998: The South's oldest textile school, located at Clemson University, celebrates its 100th anniversary with a year-long celebration that kicks off with a banquet October 9 and a weekend slate of activities on October 31. Key speaker at the 7 p.m., October 9, banquet is retired Clemson professor Claire Caskey, who put his mark on nearly 40 years of textiles graduates as an English professor.
  • 2005 - Amtrak resumes service of the Crescent south of Meridian, Mississippi for the first time since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulfcoast in late August. The New Orleans-Orlando segment of the Sunset Limited has never been restored as of 2009.
  • 2007: The CU Symphony Orchestra performs in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m., featuring Concerto Winners. Works by Wagner, Elgar, and others. Tickets are $5 for adults, students free, with general seating.
  • 2008: Clemson achieves .500 record at mid-season with a 7-12 loss to Wake Forest in Winston-Salem on a nationally televised game on ESPN.


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