2007

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Events in 2007

January[edit]

  • January 1: The Men's tennis team in the Orange Beach Classic in Orange Beach, Alabama. The Men's basketball team rises to 18th in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll and 23rd in the Associated Press rankings after a 14-0 start.
  • January 2: Men's tennis at the Orange Beach Classic. Swimming and Diving team in the Georgia Invitational in Athens. The Women's basketball team hosts Charlotte in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m., losing 62-65. Boise State provides the greatest bowl action of the season when they overtake the Oklahoma Sooners in the last two minutes of the Fiesta Bowl and force an overtime. Boise State acts like it was 1960 and pulls not one, but two, archaic trick plays out of the bag, running both a Hook and Ladder, AND a modified Statue of Liberty play to smoke the Prairie Schooner crowd, 43-42. This game is an instant classic. ESPN's Top Ten Plays of Bowl Season, aired Sunday, January 7, 2007, included three plays from the final two minutes of the Boise State - Oklahoma game. 'Nuff said. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YraRSrQTHFs
  • January 3: Men's tennis at the Orange Beach Classic in Alabama. Men's basketball team plays at Florida State at 7 p.m., winning 68-66, to remain unbeaten. Cliff Hammond's layup with three seconds left gives the Tigers the victory in the ACC opener for both schools. Clemson remains one of three unbeaten teams in the nation, joining No. 16 Oregon, and top-ranked UCLA. Swimming and Diving team in the Georgia Diving Invitational in Athens, and at Florida Atlantic in Boca Raton.
  • January 4: Men's tennis at the Orange Beach Classic, Orange Beach, Alabama. Swimming and Diving team in the Georgia Invitational in Athens.
  • January 5: Women's basketball team plays at Wake Forest at 7 p.m. - televised on RSN and FSN-S. The Lady Tigers secure first conference win, 73-57. Men's tennis team in the Orange Beach Classic, Orange Beach, Alabama. The National Weather Service issues a tornado warning for northwest South Carolina as a line of thunderstorms sweeps through the area. High winds pile up vehicles in Liberty, South Carolina, injuring four who are hospitalized in Easley and Greenville. The Clemson Wiki website tallies its 21,000th visit.
  • January 6: Men's basketball team hosts Georgia Tech in Littlejohn at 4 p.m., telecast on RSN. Letterwinners' Association holds tailgate in the IPTAY office prior to the game, beginning at 1:30 p.m. Tigers remain unbeaten, 75-74, moving season to 16-0. Previously undefeated number one UCLA falls to Oregon, 68-66.
  • January 7: Women's basketball team hosts Georgia Tech in Littlejohn Coliseum at 2 p.m., but loses, 57-63. Men's tennis team at the Orange Beach Classic, Orange Beach, Alabama.
  • January 7-January 8: Student orientation.
  • January 8: Students return to campus. The Men's basketball team is ranked 14th in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll and 17th in the Associated Press poll. The undefeated, number one-ranked, Ohio State Buckeyes are dominated by the Florida Gators, 41-14, in the Tostitos Championship game in Tempe, Arizona.
  • January 9: Men's basketball team plays at North Carolina State at 7 p.m., televised on RSN. The Tigers tie the 17-0 record of the 1986-1987 team with 87-76 win.
  • January 10: Classes begin. Duke Energy conducts a three-minute test of the emergency alert siren system of the Oconee Nuclear facility at 11:50 a.m.
  • January 11: Registration deadline for all Tiger staffers who wish to participate in the 100th anniversary celebration on March 10 in the Almeda Jacks Ballroom in the Hendrix Center from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. RSVP to Julie Ledbetter, 315 Hendrix Center, Clemson, S.C., 29634. Swimming and Diving team versus Gardner-Webb and Davidson at 6 p.m., Women's basketball team at University of North Carolina at 7 p.m., losing 100-65. The Boni Belle Brooks Series presents the Rachael Price Trio and the T.S. Monk Sextet, a jazz evening in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $20 for adults, $15 for students.
  • January 12: Men's track at Blacksburg, Virginia, 5 p.m. Women's track at the Kentucky Invitational. Men's tennis at the Bahamas Invitational, Nassau, Bahamas. Deadline for registration to Be a Clemson Cheerleader or Rally Cat for a Day, on Saturday, January 20. Ages 4-18 get to cheer on the court for one time-out and at halftime when all participants perform Tiger Rag during the Men's basketball game with Boston College! Registration is $50 and includes lunch, instructional fee and souvenir tee-shirt. Admission to the game is $18 per person.
  • January 13: Clemson hosts a FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League Competition in Littlejohn Coliseum with 50 teams of 9-14 year olds. Free admission to the public. Swim and Dive team versus North Carolina at 11 a.m. Men's track at Blacksburg, Virginia at noon. Men's basketball plays Maryland in College Park, 2 p.m., televised on ESPN-U. The Tigers fall, 87-92, for first loss of the season. Men's tennis at the Bahamas Invitational. Women's track at the Kentucky Invitational.
  • January 14: Men's tennis at the Bahamas Invitational, Nassau, Bahamas.
  • January 15: The Men's basketball team is ranked 16th in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll and 19th in the Associated Press poll following first loss of the season to Maryland.
  • January 17: Men's basketball team hosts North Carolina in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m., televised nationally on ESPN, losing 55-77 for second loss of season.
  • January 18: Vaudeville combined with science - kinda like Bill Nye, Science Guy, on Lexapro! The Brooks Center Family Series presents Garry Krinsky: Toying With Science at 7 p.m. Vaudevillian Krinsky combined his showmanship with his Jones for science and in 1995 created his Toying With Science act with a grant from the Museum of Science in Boston. And the rest is history, as they say! Tix are $6 for adults, $3 for students. Women's basketball hosts Maryland in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m., losing 60-61. The Clemson College of Business and Behavioral Science hosts a reception with Dr. Bruce Yandle, Clemson’s former Dean of the College of Business and Behavioral Science and former Executive Director of the Federal Trade Commission. The Reception is held at 6:30 p.m. Heavy Hors d’oeuvres, Wine, & Beer are served. This event kicks off the new College of Business and Behavioral Science internship program in Washington, D.C. and celebrates the bi-centennial of Thomas Green Clemson’s birth. The Club celebrates with Clemson students participating in the internship program in Washington D.C. and with other Clemson Alumni.
  • January 19: The Tiger publishes issue celebrating the 100th anniversary of the paper's founding. Men's and Women's track teams host the Clemson Invitational at 5 p.m. Men's tennis at the Rice Invitational in Texas.
  • January 20: Men's basketball team hosts Boston College in Littlejohn Coliseum at noon - televised by Raycom/Lincoln Financial. The Tigers beat the Eagles, 74-54.
  • January 21: Women's basketball team plays at Boston College at 2 p.m., but lose, 64-69.
  • January 22: The Men's basketball team is ranked 17th in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll and 19th in the Associated Press poll, with an 18-2 record.
  • January 23: The Clemson City Council holds a public hearing at the First Baptist Church Family Life Center at 7 p.m. to receive comments regarding a potential ordinance that would prohibit smoking in public building locations. Free parking at the Clemson parking deck. It is announced that Bowden Bowl IX will open the football season when the Tigers host FSU in Death Valley on September 3 at 8 p.m., televised nationally on ESPN. This will lead to the First Friday parade morphing into the first-ever First Sunday parade.
  • January 25: Women's basketball hosts Maryland in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m., but loses 62-76. Men's basketball team travels to number ten-ranked Duke, 7 p.m., televised on ESPN, but loses a heartbreaker, 66-68, when the Blue Devils sink a lay-up as the buzzer sounds. Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano, one of the premiere mariachi ensembles in the world, in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students.
  • January 26: Atlantic Coast Conference officials admit this date that a timing error was made in the closing seconds of the Clemson loss to Number 10-ranked Duke on January 25. The league officials reviewed the game film, and acknowledge that the clock was not started at the correct time, and discussed the matter with both Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski and Clemson Coach Oliver Purnell. "I am satisfied with their review in the matter," said Purnell. "We now need to put one hundred percent of our focus on our game with Virginia and that is what we will do." A Duke spokesman said that school officials would have no comment. Men's track in the Clemson Heptathlon at 5 p.m. Women's track in the Clemson Pentathlon, and at the Niswonger Invitational at Johnson City, Tennessee. The Clemson Wiki website Main Page tallies its 22,000th visit.
  • January 27: The swim and dive team hosts North Carolina State at 11 a.m. Women's tennis hosts College of Charleston at 11 a.m. Men's track in the Clemson University Heptathlon at 11 a.m. Women's track in the Clemson University Pentathlon and at the Niswonger Invitational, Johnson City, Tennessee. Men's tennis at Southern Methodist University.
  • January 28: The Lady Tigers play at Miami at 2 p.m., winning 79-69. The Men's basketball team hosts Virginia in Littlejohn Coliseum at 1 p.m. - coverage by SC, R/LF networks. The Tigers go cold for last five minutes of play, lose fifteen point lead, and lose to the Cavaliers, 63-64. Men's tennis at Texas Christian University, and versus Texas A&M-Corpus Christi at Fort Worth, Texas.
  • January 28-February 1: The 16th annual Shakespeare Festival examines the theme "Shakespeare and Tourism" with a variety of performances, lectures, workshops, and films. Aquila Theatre Company will serve as resident company and present their production of Romeo and Juliet.
  • January 28: Shakespeare Behind Bars, a 2005 documentary about Kentucky prison inmates who stage a production of The Tempest, is shown in the McKissick Theatre in the Hendrix Student Center at 3 p.m.
  • January 29: The Men's basketball team drops to 21 in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll and to 25 in the Associated Press poll after two ACC losses. Tromeo and Juliet, a 1996 cult classic from Troma Film, producers of The Toxic Avenger, is shown in the McKissick Theatre in the Hendrix Student Center at 8 p.m. ADVISORY - Due to mature content, this film may not be suitable for all audiences.
  • January 30: The Albert Hamilton Holt Colloquium presents "Shakespeare and Tourism", 5-7 p.m. in Brooks Center Room 117, with Lisa Friedman, Gallatin School, New York University, Dr. Sharon O'Dair, University of Alabama, and Dr. John Ford, Delta State University.
  • January 31: Panel discussion with professors Friedman and O'Dair and tourism expert Michelle McCollum. Moderated by Dr. Ford. In the Brooks Center, Room 117, 4-5 p.m.
  • January 31-February 1: A multi-talented group of British and American performers, the Aquila Theatre Company, present THE great love story, Romeo and Juliet, in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $18 for adults, $10 for students, with general seating.

February[edit]

  • February 1: A multi-talented group of British and American performers, the Aquila Theatre Company, present THE great love story, Romeo and Juliet, in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $18 for adults, $10 for students, with general seating. As part of the Clemson University Shakespeare Festival XVI, the Charles Paz Memorial Workshop held, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at the Brooks Center Stage. Women's tennis at the ITA Champs meet in Madison, Wisconsin.
  • February 2: The Clemson Players stage Henry V in Edgar's in the student union at 8 p.m. Women's tennis at the ITA Champs meet in Madison, Wisconsin.
  • February 3: The Men's basketball team plays at Georgia Tech at 1 p.m. Men's tennis hosts the Citadel at 9 a.m. Men's track at the Carolina Invitational. The swim and dive team hosts Duke at 1 p.m. Men's tennis hosts Charleston Southern at 3 p.m. Women's tennis at the ITA Champs meet at Madison, Wisconsin.
  • February 4: Women's tennis at the ITA Champs meet at Madison, Wisconsin.
  • February 5: The Women's basketball team plays at Duke at 7 p.m. - televised on RSN.
  • February 6: Men's tennis plays at Georgia at 3 p.m. The Utsey Chamber Series Endowment presents Brazilian-born pianist Arnaldo Cohen in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m.. Free admission.
  • February 7: The Men's basketball team hosts Florida State in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7:30 p.m.
  • February 8: The Women's basketball team plays at North Carolina State at 7 p.m.
  • February 9: The Clemson University Choral Ensembles in a "Pops" concert in the Brooks Center, at 8 p.m. The Clemson University Singers, Men's Glee, Women's Glee, and the very popular a cappella ensembles, Impulse, Southern Accents, TakeNote and Tigeroar, will offer golden oldies, spirituals, jazz favorites and contemporary pop. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for students, with general seating.
  • February 11: The Women's basketball team hosts Virginia Tech in Littlejohn Coliseum at 2 p.m.
  • February 14: The Men's basketball team plays at Wake Forest at 7 p.m. - televised by ESPN-U.
  • February 15: The Lady Tigers host Wake Forest in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m.
  • February 16-February 18: Clemson hosts the Southern Energy Network’s major shindig—the Fourth Annual Southeast Student Renewable Energy Conference. The event promotes alternative power sources for university campuses. Registration is $20, but scholarships are available.
  • February 18: The Men's basketball team hosts Maryland in Littlejohn Coliseum at 4 p.m. - televised by Raycom/Lincoln Financial - split. The Tiger Letterwinners Association hosts tailgate before the basketball game, in the large multi-purpose room, upstairs in the IPTAY Center/Ticket Office, beginning at 1:30 p.m. Association members will be admitted with one guest on presentation of a membership card. Additional guests, $5 adult, $3 child.
  • February 19: Women's basketball team plays at Georgia Tech at 7 p.m. - televised on RSN.
  • February 22: Women's basketball team plays at Florida State at 7 p.m. Men's basketball hosts Duke in Littlejohn Coliseum at 9 p.m. - televised by ESPN.
  • February 22-February 25: Funny and irreverent musical Urinetown is presented by the Clemson Players in the Brooks Center, directed by Mark Charney, theatre department head, at 8 p.m., February 22-24, and 3 p.m., February 25. Admission $10 adults, $5 students, with general seating.
  • February 24: The Men's basketball team plays at Boston College at 1 p.m. - televised by Raycom/Lincoln Financial - split.
  • February 25: Women's basketball team hosts Virginia in Littlejohn Coliseum at 2 p.m.
  • February 27: The Clemson University Jazz Ensemble performs big band and small group arrangements of music by prominent American composers in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Guest artists. Free admission.
  • February 28: The Men's basketball team hosts Miami in Littlejohn Coliseum at 7:30 p.m.

March[edit]

  • March: The burned out wing of restaurants and shops of Victoria Square on College Avenue has been razed to the concrete slab.
  • March: Tiger Band is recognized by College Bands Directors National Association (CBDNA), the premiere professional college band organization in the United States, as one of four schools to present a "live" on videotape performance at the bi-annual conference, held later this month at Ann Arbor, Michigan. This is a first-time opportunity in a newly-created category. Dr. Mark Spede selected the 2006 Rent half-time show as Tiger Band's best effort.
  • March 4: The Men's basketball team plays at Virginia Tech at 1 p.m. - televised by Raycom/Lincoln Financial network.
  • March 6: The Clemson University Symphonic Band presents a program of the best of traditional and contemporary music for the band medium, 8 p.m., in the Brooks Center. Free admission.
  • March 8: As part of the Family Series, the Brooks Center hosts Cirque Le Masque at 7 p.m. Created by Dennis and Bernie Schussel of Le Masquerade Entertainment Group, this company has provided sophisticated entertainment for over two decades with first-class performers, colorful costumes, creative music and unique special effects. Admission for the gravity-defying acts, acrobatics and dance routines is $10 for adults, $5 for students.
  • March 9: The National Convention of Mu Beta Psi, the national music honor and service fraternity, is held at Clemson in recognition of Delta chapter, which went inactive in 2005, after 70 years of service to Clemson University.
  • March 10: Annual Brooks Center Fundraiser held at 7 p.m. in the Madren Center Ballroom - don casual clothes and enjoy delicious food, music by the Second Nature Band of Camden, and a fabulous silent auction. Last year's fundraiser sold out, so purchase tickets early. All proceeds help to support Brooks Center activities. Admission is $75 per person ($37.50 tax deductible) - limited to 200 people. "The evening was a hit, and we raised over $32,000," reported Barbara Schwartz, chairperson of the fundraiser. The staff of The Tiger hosts a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the paper's founding, in the Almeda Jacks Ballroom of the Hendrix Center, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. All Tiger staffers are invited. RSVP to Julie Ledbetter, 315 Hendrix Center, Clemson, S.C., 29634 by January 11, 2007. Mu Beta Psi national convention banquet held in the Madren Center at 7 p.m.
  • March 12: The Clemson City Council holds a work session to discuss a possible smoking ban in Clemson public areas, 6 p.m. in the depot conference room.
  • March 13: The Boni Belle Brooks Series presents M-PACT, called one of the best pop-jazz vocal groups in the world, in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $20 for adults, $15 for students.
  • March 19-March 23: Spring break.
  • March 24: Clemson Crew wins the Men's points trophy at Clemson Sprints.
  • March 29: The Boni Belle Brooks Series presents the musical Wonderful Town in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. All tickets $30. The Clemson men's basketball team faces West Virginia in the NIT final at 7 p.m. EDT on ESPN. The Mountaineer's Frank Young scores 24 points as West Virginia captures the 70th annual NIT championship with a 78-73 victory over Clemson at Madison Square Garden.
  • March 30: Twelfth annual Campus Sweep takes place, with students, faculty, and staff cleaning up the campus, and landscaping. A tree-planting ceremony at 9:30 a.m. on the lawn of the president's mansion, kicks off the event.

April[edit]

  • April: Big Dave's BBQ opens at 1060 Tiger Boulevard, Clemson.
  • April 1-April 30: Visual Arts Exhibition - "Images of the South" featuring Jeff Callahan, in the Fran Hanson Discovery Center, South Carolina Botanical Garden, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free admission.
  • April 2: The ClemsonWiki project tallies its 25,000th hit.
  • April 5: Inside the CU Percussion Ensemble, lecture-demonstration, in the Band Room, Brooks Center, 12:45 p.m., free.
  • April 9-April 11: Alpha Epsilon Delta, Clemson's Pre-Professional Health Honor Society, hosts the Second Annual Orange Pride blood drive on campus. Hendrix Ballrooms A and B, and in the Hendrix Multiuse Room.
  • April 12: The Clemson University Choral Ensembles feature a program of traditional and contemporary choral music in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Performing groups include the Clemson University Singers, Women's Glee, and Men's Glee. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for students, with general seating.
  • April 13: Southern jam band Perpetual Groove brings its "trance arena rock" to Littlejohn Coliseum, 8 p.m.
  • April 14: Some 350 gather at the Strom Thurmond Institute between 1 and 2 p.m. for the Step It Up environmental rally to draw attention to the threat of global warming, and calling on the Congress to cut carbon dioxide emissions 80 percent by 2050.
  • April 15: Department of Performing Arts "Pops" concert, Owen Pavilion, Madren Center at 5 p.m., $20 pavilion seating, $8 lawn seating.
  • April 16-April 20: Master of Fine Arts exhibition, "Bound and Undone", Lee Gallery, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., free.
  • April 16: Clemson and the world are stunned by the tragic shootings on the Blacksburg campus of ACC-member school Virginia Tech that leave 32 students and faculty dead. The shooter commits suicide.
  • April 16: The Anderson Independent-Mail, in an article by Doug Staley, reports this date that three attorneys have been asked to defend Jerry Buck Inman, the man accused of killing 20-year-old Clemson University student Tiffany Souers in May 2006.
In an unusual move, South Carolina Circuit Judge Edward Miller appointed Inman’s original attorney, Symmes Culbertson, along with Greenville attorney Jim Bannister and Pickens County Public Defender John W. DeJong to represent Inman during a brief hearing Monday at the Pickens County Courthouse.
Judge Miller said he was concerned that having only one other appointed representative to assist Mr. DeJong, Pickens County’s sole public defender, could create a backlog in the county’s criminal docket. All three attorneys are qualified to handle death penalty cases.
“I don’t think this is going to seriously impair the solicitor’s ability to try the case,” said Judge Miller, who was assigned to hear the case in March by the state Supreme Court. Previous hearings had been handled by Circuit Judge John Few.
Inman faces charges of murder, kidnapping, criminal sexual conduct in the first degree and burglary in connection with Ms. Souers’ death. Inman waived his right to appear in court and was not present for the hearing.
Ms. Souers, a civil engineering student from Ladue, Mo., was found dead in her off-campus apartment in Central.
Solicitor Bob Ariail disagreed with the judge’s move, saying it would appear as though Inman was getting preferential treatment by the court and that it could place a strain on the state’s indigent defense fund.He said that under state law defendants facing the death penalty are entitled to two attorneys.
“This defendant is going to have three attorneys appointed by the court and paid for by the public,” Mr. Ariail said. “It has not been the pattern of the court previously.”
In arguing for a third attorney, Mr. Bannister, who was appointed lead counsel for the defense, told the judge Mr. Culbertson’s experience and attorney-client relationship with Inman would be an asset to the defense.
“He is eminently qualified to handle a death penalty case,” Mr. Bannister said.
Judge Miller reiterated to the attorneys that a gag order remains in effect.
It appears the case will not go to trial until early next year based on comments made by attorneys at the hearing.
“There are some issues on our side that we need to deal with before we determine a reasonable trial date,” Mr. Bannister said. “I think in the next three to four weeks we should have a target date."
  • April 18: Interkosmos A Mockumentary, Southern Circuit Film Screening, McKissick Theatre, Hendrix Student Center, 7:30 p.m., free admission.
  • April 18: Over 1,200 orange and maroon-clad students and faculty gather in the Amphitheatre at 9 p.m. in a candlelight vigil for the victims and all those affected by the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech on April 16.
  • April 21: Junior Cullen Harper tightens his hold on the starting quarterback position with a three touchdown effort in the annual spring football game, leading the Orange from a 13-0 deficit to a 35-16 victory over the Purple. Attendence tops 20,000 for the first time.
  • April 23: An Evening with Bryan Collier, children's book illustrator and author, Clemson/Central Public Library, 6 p.m., free.
  • April 24: President Barker asks everyone on campus at 2 p.m. to pause for a moment at this time to "quietly join the Clemson family with the Virginia Tech family." Job Fair held on campus sponsored by Tiger Paw Productions - adult employee day.
  • April 25: Job Fair held on campus sponsored by Tiger Paw Productions - youth employee day. Singer Kenny Floyd and his band appear at the 356 on College Avenue at 10 p.m.
  • April 26: The ClemsonWiki project main page tallies its 26,000th hit. Gainesville, Florida quintet Sister Hazel performs on the lawn at Littlejohn Coliseum at 9 p.m., produced by Tiger Paw Productions and the Clemson University Student Government. Tix are $10 and benefit philanthropic projects for a multitude of student organizations. Opening act is By'r Lady.
  • April 27: The C.U. Percussion Ensemble and C.U. Steel Band in concert in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. The Clemson Little Theatre presents The Spitfire Grill at 8 p.m. Poolstick plays at the Esso Club at 10 p.m., while Russell & Jonathon perform at TD's at 10:30 p.m.
  • April 28: Clemson defensive end Gaines Adams ties Banks McFadden for highest pick for a Tiger football player in the NFL draft when the Tampa Bay Buccaneers select him fourth in the first round. The Clemson Little Theatre presents The Spitfire Grill at 8 p.m.
  • April 29: The Clemson Little Theatre presents The Spitfire Grill at 3 p.m. Ruff O'Brien performs acoustic music at Pitchers at 7 p.m.

May[edit]

  • YNK, a private club located in Rogers Plaza on US 123, Tiger Boulevard, is opened by Richard Martin.
  • May 5: The Daily Messenger reports this date (page 1A, Vol. 103, No. 83) that Tower Place, a five-story, mixed-use building will be erected on the former site of Small World Travel at 393 College Avenue. College Avenue Development LLC recently received approval from the Clemson Architectural and Review Board to build the $3-$3.5 million project which will feature two small restaurants and an outdoor courtyard on street level, and seven condos on upper floors. Construction is expected to begin in July and work to last about ten months.
  • May 10: Candidates for graduation can access grades.
  • May 11: Commencement - Colleges AF&LS, AA&H, E&S at 9:30 a.m., Colleges B&BS, HE&HD at 2:30 p.m. Deadline for IPTAY football season ticket requests.
  • May 14: Late registration and first day of class for Maymester 2007.
  • May 15: Last day to register for Maymester 2007 - late enrollment fee applies.
  • May 16: Last day to drop a class or withdraw from the university for Maymester 2007 without a W grade.
  • May 18: Relay for Life held at the Shaver Complex in Seneca. Call 864-885-2700 for information. The Oconee Community Theatre presents Harvey at 8 p.m. For information, call 864-882-1910.
  • May 19: The Oconee Community Theatre presents Harvey at 8 p.m. For information, call 864-882-1910. The ClemsonWiki project tallies its 27,000th hit.
  • May 20: The Oconee Community Theatre presents Harvey at 3 p.m. For info, call 864-882-1910.
  • May 21: Last day for instructors to issue mid-term grades for Maymester 2007. Late registration for first summer session.
  • May 22: Last day to drop a class or withdraw from the university without final grades for Maymester 2007. First summer session classes begin - late enrollment fee applies.
  • May 23: Last day to register or add a class for first summer session.
  • May 25: Last day to drop a class or withdraw from the university without a W grade for the first summer session.
  • May 26: Maymester 2007 classes meet.
  • May 29: Examinations for Maymester 2007 held.
  • May 30: The USA Today reports this date that Clemson University professor Paul Dawson is working on ways to prevent contamination of hot dogs, sliced deli meats and other foods with the listeria bacteria. About 2,500 people get sick and 500 die annually from the bacteria, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dawson hopes to pasteurize entire packages of meat by immersing them in 160-degree water.

June[edit]

  • Summer: The Almond shuts down.
  • June 1: 9 a.m. - deadline to submit all grades for Maymester 2007. The Clemson baseball team, ranked 13th, defeats St. John's, 3-2, in the Myrtle Beach Regional. Clemson head coach Jack Leggett wins his fiftieth NCAA Tournament game with the walk-off hit by Brad Chalk in the bottom of the ninth. Leggett already had the Clemson record for NCAA Tournament wins by a coach with a 50-28 NCAA Tournament record. Bill Wilhelm had 42 between 1958-93.
  • June 3: Clemson defeats Coastal Carolina, 11-8, in the Myrtle Beach Regional, in nine innings.
  • June 4: The Tiger baseball team defeats the Coastal Carolina Chanticleers, 15-3, in the Myrtle Beach Regional to advance to the Super Regionals. The Tigers had a six-run fourth inning, and at one point, led 13-0. Also, pursuant to Sections 6-1-320 and 6-1-330 of the South Carolina Code of Laws, the City of Clemson, South Carolina hereby gives notice of a public hearing to be held on Monday, June 4, 2007 at 6:45 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers, 1250 Tiger Boulevard. The governing body of the City of Clemson is holding the public hearing in order to consider increases in the ad valorem tax millage, and for user fees and services for the City’s fiscal year beginning July 1, 2007 and ending June 30, 2008. The governing body will receive public comment at the beginning of the public hearing.
  • June 5: "Piano Impressions" at the Brooks Center, 10:00 a.m. - This workshop explores some the greatest masterworks in the piano repertoire. Linda Li-Bleuel, professor of music, discusses and performs compositions by Schubert, Debussey, and Bartok. Tuition includes themed lunch. Reservations due Tuesday, May 2. $40 per person.
  • June 6: Last day for instructors to issue midterm grades for the first summer session. "Tosca" at the Brooks Center, 10 a.m. - Considered one of the most popular operas of all time, Puccini's Tosca features an intense story coupled with a beautiful score. Andrew Levin, professor of music and director of the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra, discusses the history of Tosca, plays music and video samples of the opera, as well as talks about how operas are produced. Tuition includes themed lunch. Reservations due Wednesday, May 30. $40 per person.
  • June 7: "Musical Offerings" at the Brooks Center, 10 a.m. - Christopher Matthews, Clemson's director of choral activities, leads this workshop on the history of music in the church. Using music samples and singing representative chants, chorales, praise choruses, in additional to traditional and contemporary hymns, he demonstrates the theological concepts that shape the music of Christian worship. Tuition includes themed lunch. Reservation due Wednesday, May 31. $40 per person.
  • June 8: The Clemson baseball team takes on Mississippi State in the Super Regionals at Starkville, Mississippi at 11:00 AM CT, televised by ESPN. Mississippi State scores eight runs in innings 5-7 to rally for an 8-6 win over fifth-ranked Clemson in game one of the Starkville Super Regional, in front of 12,620 fans at Dudy Noble Field. This is the largest crowd to ever see an NCAA Super Regional game. The 17th-ranked Bulldogs, take a 1-0 lead in the best-of-three series, improving to 37-20 overall, while the Tigers fall to 41-22.
  • June 9: Clemson is eliminated in the second game of the Super Regional against the Mississippi State Bulldogs in front of a Super Regional crowd of 13,715, with the Tigers falling, 5-8.
  • June 11: Last day to order diploma for August graduation.
  • June 15-June 17: The Brooks Center presents WordBRIDGE in the Bellamy Theatre at 8 p.m. Prices TBA. WordBRIDGE offers patrons a chance to interact with a unique playwriting laboratory where a variety of nationally selected writers work in a creative environment to develop their work. WordBRIDGE features two one-person shows and a variety of stage-readings, workshops, and lectures.
  • June 16: The ClemsonWiki project tallies its 28,000th hit.
  • June 17: ESPNU rebroadcasts the Clemson-Florida State game from Saturday, September 16, 2006, in which the Tigers score with seven seconds left to win, 27-20, their first victory in Tallahassee since 1989.
  • June 19: Greer resident Grant Burns has been elected president of Clemson University’s Alumni Association. He officially steps into the role July 1. Burns is a lawyer with Nexsen Pruet in Greenville. He graduated from Clemson with a bachelor’s in political science in 1988 and graduated from the Washington and Lee University School of Law in 1991. While at Clemson, he served as student body president his senior year and was a member of Tiger Brotherhood, Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, IPTAY Student Advisory Board and was a university tour guide. As an alumnus, Burns continues to be an active member of the Clemson family. He has been a member of the Alumni National Council, the governing body of the Alumni Association, since 2003. He served as president of the Greenville Clemson Club in 1998-99 and served as a member of the club’s board of directors from 1995 to 2002. He is a member of the Tiger Golf Gathering board of directors and a member of the Clemson University Alumni Lawyers Society. He received the Greenville Clemson Club Super Tiger Award for 2005-06.
  • June 26: Examinations held for the first summer session. Former Virginia Tech and Davidson head basketball coach Bobby Hussey dies this date in a medical facility in Charlotte, North Carolina, age 67. He coached the Hokies for two seasons (1997-1999), and spent his final three seasons as an assistant at Clemson. Also, David M. Hamilton, chair of the Planning Commission, dies this date, from complications of diabetes. He was active in Clemson City government, serving as a member of the Planning Commission since 1999 and as chair since February 2006. David also chaired the Comprehensive Plan 2014 Housing subcommittee and served on the Police Advisory Board. David earned degrees from Clemson University in microbiology and languages and taught German in the languages department from 1999 until 2001. He was a longtime tutor with the student-athlete enrichment center at the university. His funeral service will be held at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 1, at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Clemson. The family will receive friends following the service. David is survived by his mother, Mary Bell Chou. Condolences may be sent to the family at Hamilton's home: 205 Strawberry Lane, Clemson, SC 29631. Condolences may also be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home, Central-Clemson Commons. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 120 Wall Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10005.
  • June 28: 9 a.m. - Deadline to submit all grades for the first summer session.
  • June 29: George McCorkle, a founding member of the Marshall Tucker Band who wrote the favorite "Fire On The Mountain", died this date at University Medical Center in Lebanon, Tennessee, near Nashville. He had cancer. He was 60. McCorkle wrote the song in hopes that it would be included on longtime friend Charlie Daniel's album of the same title. When Daniels ended up not using it, Marshall Tucker Band put it on their Searchin' For A Rainbow release in 1975. "Fire On The Mountain" became the band's first Top 40 hit single and is one of the most popular songs in Southern rock. McCorkle quit MTB in 1984, moved to Tennessee in the 1990s and began working as a songwriter full-time. He co-wrote "Cowbow Blues", recorded by Gary Allan for his Smoke Rings in the Dark album. Other McCorkle songs have recently been recorded by John Corbett and Beverly Mitchell. McCorkle also played with the Renegades of Southern Rock, made up of original members of Wet Willie, the Outlaws and other groups. ("The Washington Post" obituary, Monday, July 2, 2007, page B-6). The ClemsonWiki project Main Page tallies hit 29,000.
  • June 30: The Clemson University Tiger Band Association annual meeting held in room 115 of the Brooks Center at 11 a.m.

July[edit]

  • July 2: Orientation for the second summer session.
  • July 3: Late registration for the second summer session.
  • July 5: Columbia (Associated Press) - Oakland Raiders reserve defensive end Bryant McNeal was arrested today on an outstanding warrant following a traffic stop in South Carolina. McNeal, 27, was wanted in Florida for selling a Land Rover to a pawn broker for $15,000 when he didn’t own it, said Clearwater, Fla., police spokesman Wayne Shelor. When McNeal, who spent the 2005 training camp with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, didn’t return to claim the car, Carbucks Corp. tried to collect the title. However, the company found that McNeal had not paid off a bank loan, Shelor said. A warrant for McNeal’s arrest was issued in December 2005 on a charge of defrauding a pawn broker, Shelor said. The former Clemson star was stopped at 3:35 a.m. Thursday in Lexington County where he lives and charged with driving with a suspended license and operating a vehicle without a headlight. He will remain at the Lexington County jail until Florida authorities make arrangements for his extradition, Lexington County sheriff’s spokesman Maj. John Allard said in an e-mail. Allard said McNeal told authorities he did not have an attorney. McNeal was also served an arrest warrant from Richland County for writing a fraudulent $1,500 check to Berger Dental Group, the Lexington County sheriff’s department said in a news release. McNeal was signed to the Raiders practice squad last season. “We take matters of this nature very seriously,” Oakland spokesman Mike Taylor said today. “But until we have all of the facts, it would be inappropriate to comment or otherwise react.” McNeal, who starred at Swansea High in South Carolina, was a two-year starter at Clemson. He led the Tigers with eight sacks his senior season and was selected to the all-Atlantic Coast Conference second team in 2002. McNeal was picked by the Denver Broncos in the fourth round of the 2003 draft and won a spot in the team’s defensive line rotation. However, a lower back injury limited his effectiveness and he spent the second half of his rookie season on injured reserve. The next summer, McNeal was signed to Denver’s practice squad after the club waived him before the season started. McNeal signed with Tampa Bay in December 2004 before being cut before the next season began. Also, classes begin for the second summer session; late enrollment fee applies.
  • July 7: Second summer session classes meet.
  • July 9: Last day to drop a class or withdraw from the University without a W grade for the second summer session. The ClemsonWiki project Main Page tallies its 29,000th hit.
  • July 13: MSNBC reports this date that Clemson researchers have proven that the "five second" rule for food hitting the ground is valid - bacterial contamination is minimal if the item is picked up immediately. Wet items become septic much more quickly than dry items, and contamination increases with time.
  • July 19: Last day for instructors to issue midterm grades for the second summer session.
  • July 25: Clemson University's Air Force ROTC Detachment 770 Flyin' Tigers has been named the Most Outstanding Air Force ROTC Detachment in the Southeast Region. The honor, known as the High Flight Award, is presented each year to one detachment in each of three size categories of small, medium and large. According to Col. Lance Young, the detachment competed for the first time this year in the large category. It competed against 39 detachments across nine states and Puerto Rico. Detachment 770 now moves forward to compete for the Right of Line Award which will be announced the first week in November, honoring the best detachment in the nation from among 144 detachments comprised of approximately 16,000 cadets. The Flyin’ Tigers won the High Flight Award for demonstrating excellence in a variety of categories that include production, education and cadet activities, all designed to promote the military heritage of Clemson and maintain the integrity of the unit. The group’s activities include, among many others, Veteran’s Home visits, hosting the yearly Tiger Drill Meet for hundreds of JROTC cadets from five states, an annual POW/MIA recognition program, an annual Veteran’s Day program, an annual Pass-in-Review on Bowman Field, and co-sponsorship of the Military Appreciation Day event. Col. Young cites teamwork, a 100 percent effort from each individual, and the unmatched environment for success provided by Clemson University and the local community as reasons for the recognition. “It is an honor in itself for our cadets to be recognized at this level, but the most rewarding part is that these cadets are being recognized at this high level consistently, year in and year out,” Young said. “I don’t think this would be possible without all the outstanding support we receive from so many – the university, the community, Clemson Corps, Air Force Association and the students. This is a total ‘One Clemson’ effort.” The Clemson Corps is a constituency group dedicated to continuing Clemson’s military heritage and developing other opportunities to commemorate the military history of the university. In addition, it aims to support Clemson’s Army and Air Force ROTC programs through annual scholarships and endowments. To learn more about AFROTC Detachment 770 go to http://virtual.clemson.edu/groups/afrotc/.
  • July 28: Word reaches Alumni of The Tiger of the creation of the Dr. Louis Henry Endowment, named for the long-time faculty advisor to the student newspaper. The fund, created as part of the paper's centennial celebration, will be administered by the Clemson Fund.
  • July 31: Target date for reopening Old Central Road with a new bridge over the Norfolk Southern rail line.

August[edit]

  • August 1: The ClemsonWiki Main Page tallies its 30,000th hit.
  • August 2: The ClemsonWiki project Current Events column tallies its 5,000th hit.
  • August 3: Deadline for Brooks Center subscribers to purchase season tickets for events in the 2007-2008 season.
  • August 8: Exams held for the second summer session. Clemson held its first football practice in full pads in near 100 degree heat on Wednesday afternoon. The practice was just two hours, the shortest of the preseason, due to exams that closed the second session of summer school at Clemson. "We were a bit discombobulated because we had a lot of players either late or not here due to exams," said Head Coach Tommy Bowden. "We stressed tempo throughout and got some things done. It was the fifth straight day of practice in 90 degree heat. When you go to a full pads practice leaders come forward because it is tough. We couldn't simulate this heat in the spring. But, I was satisfied with what we got accomplished. We worked some inside drill and that gave us some full speed looks. We didn't tackle to the ground except on a few drills. We will see more of that on Saturday." The Tigers will have their first day of two-a-day practices on Thursday, working in the morning and the evening. The team will practice once on Friday, then have a stadium scrimmage Saturday morning. The scrimmage will be closed to the public.
  • August 9: 2 p.m. - Deadline to submit candidate grades for the second summer session. Clemson University was awarded a $160,000 Campus Heritage grant from the Getty Foundation to develop a heritage preservation plan for the campus. The grant will support a project to maintain Clemson’s historic architectural, landscape and spatial assets, and to educate and train the people of Clemson University in the best ways to protect and maintain them. Goals of the project include developing a comprehensive inventory of campus historic resources, producing a National Register eligibility assessment, and creating a campus stewardship strategy that involves the campus and community. John Milner Associates of Charlottesville, Va., has been hired to develop the preservation master plan. “One of the primary goals of this project is to provide a variety of education options to students interested in historic preservation and related fields such as architecture, landscape architecture, history, geography, archaeology and engineering,” says Cari Goetcheus, an assistant professor of landscape architecture at Clemson. Goetcheus shares project supervisor duties with Dan Nadenicek, chairman of Clemson’s department of landscape architecture. Students will have the opportunity to participate in hands-on research, field work, research projects and independent studies allowing them to learn about preservation planning, techniques, approaches and interpretation,” Goetcheus said. Since 2002, through its Campus Heritage Initiative, the Getty Foundation has awarded grants to 86 colleges and universities for preservation planning, as well as funding surveys of hundreds of small liberal arts colleges. These grants have played a catalytic role in helping institutions of higher education understand the significance of the historic resources on their campuses and plan for their long-term preservation. The current round of grants represents the final year of the initiative. “American colleges and universities are frequently unique repositories of some of the country’s finest historic architecture and designed landscapes,” says Deborah Marrow, director of the Getty Foundation. “While other buildings may have had a variety of owners and uses over the years, campus buildings have for the most part remained under the same stewardship, which presents wonderful opportunities for preservation and education. ”Campus Heritage grants reflect the Getty Foundation’s emphasis on thorough planning to ensure thoughtful and successful historic preservation. “Over the past six years, we have been pleased to assist colleges and universities as they make plans to care for, maintain and preserve their important historic resources,” Marrow says. “We look forward to learning about the results of these grants in the coming year.”
  • August 10: 9 a.m. - Deadline to submit other grades for the second summer session. Candidates for graduation may access grades.
  • August 11: Graduation held.
  • August 12: Clemson football Fan Appreciation Day held at Memorial Stadium. Also, the ClemsonWiki project tallies its 5,000th hit for the Community Portal.
  • August 16: Online tickets and single event tickets go on sale for the Brooks Center for the 2007-2008 season. Go to www.clemson.edu/Brooks for details. Also, Clemson running back Ray Ray McElrathbey suffers tear to his anterior cruciate ligament during Thusday practice, a season-ending injury. He had undergone arthroscopic knee surgery a month before which limited his offseason workouts.
  • August 18: In the Associated Press preseason poll, Clemson only tallies enough votes to be ranked 41st.
  • August 19: Deadline for registration for Alumni Band appearance in the First Sunday Parade.
  • August 20: The Welcome Back Festival held from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, on College Avenue. More than 60 local businesses and university organizations have tables at the festival with samples and prizes that can be exchanged for tickets. Tickets can be purchased for 50 cents each, with proceeds going to the Student Alumni Council Endowment Fund, which helps fund scholarships. Admission to the festival is free and open to the public. The Clemson Rally Cats, the Tiger mascot, the cheerleaders, Clemson student-athletes and other special guests will provide entertainment on the stage, and disc jockeys from radio station Hot 98.1 will play music. Clemson University President James F. Barker and Clemson Mayor Larry Abernathy will also be on-hand to welcome the crowd. The Welcome Back Festival is sponsored by the Clemson Student Alumni Council and Clemson Alumni Association with support from the city of Clemson and area businesses.
  • August 21: Black Dog Music, Clemson's last dedicated music store, located in Victoria Square, closes its doors.
  • August 22: Classes begin for fall semester. School District Pickens County classes begin.
  • August 23-August 25: Spitoono XXVII held at the National Guard Armory.
  • August 26: The ClemsonWiki main page tallies its 31,000th hit.
  • August 27: Internet bomb threat causes Sikes Hall to be evacuated. No bomb is found. Clemson University names Doug Hallenbeck of Southern Methodist University in Dallas as its executive director of housing on this date. Hallenbeck is assistant vice president for student affairs and director of residence life and student housing at SMU, a position he has held since 2003. Prior to that, he worked at Oklahoma State University as assistant director of residential life and at the University of Florida as a residence director. Hallenbeck is president of the Southwest Association of College and University Housing Officers.
  • August 28: An 18-year-old Clemson swimmer, Amy Marie Moxie, collapses while jogging Tuesday afternoon and dies at the hospital, said Clemson University authorities. The freshman from Simpsonville had just completed her first week on campus and was on the Tigers roster as a middle distance swimmer. Swim coach Christopher Ip said Moxie was jogging on her own to prepare for practice. Ip said Moxie's sister is a sophomore nursing student. The school said information about Moxie's funeral and a campus memorial service will be announced later. Pickens County Chief Deputy Coroner Kandy Kelley said an autopsy is scheduled for Wednesday, August 29.
  • August 29: Clemson swimmer Amy Marie Moxie died from a heart ailment that likely couldn't be detected beforehand, an autopsy revealed. She had aorta dissection, where a tear in the layer of the wall of the blood vessel leading from the heart can cause the entire blood vessel to rupture.
  • Summer: Walgreen's Drugs negotiates leases for the BP-Amoco station at Tiger Boulevard and College Avenue, the property occupied by Campus Camera, and the Laundramat/Liquor store parcel on College Avenue, in preparation for a new store. Construction likely after the first of the year. The long-moribund gas and go mart on the southwest corner of College Avenue and Tiger Boulevard is razed and a Starbuck's is reportedly going in on the site. It was closed over a year ago after the Anderson County-based operators fell behind in paying their county business taxes. This was the Hess Station, (with different architecture), with rotating signs, that is visible in outside shots of Lamar's on 123 By-Pass in the film "The Midnight Man". The Acropolis closes and is converted to Griffin's Sports Bar & Grill. Explorer's changes hands and reopens as the Shadow of the Valley sports bar. Chanelo's Pizza closes. The White Rabbit gift shop closes. The burned-out wing of Victoria Square is rebuilt. The long-moribund pool in Holtzendorff Hall is demolished and remodelling of the space begins. This was where Catherine Bach told Burt Lancaster to "f*ck off" in "The Midnight Man"
  • August 30: The bridge over the Norfolk Southern rail line on Old Central Road finally reopens, about a month past the target date. The Sleuth cable channel airs "The Midnight Man".
  • August 31: The Oconee Community Theatre in Seneca presents "The Sound of Music" - music by Richard Rogers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.

September[edit]

  • September 1: Clemson fans coming to campus for the first football game on Labor Day can enjoy two outdoor shows for $10 each at Littlejohn Coliseum. See 10 bands for $10 on Saturday, Sept. 1, at B93.7’s Last Chance Summer Dance. The show will feature “American Idol” contestant Elliot Yamin, hip hop/reggae artist Sean Kingston and eight other artists. The show also will feature inflatable games and other activities. Gates open at 4 p.m. The Oconee Community Theatre in Seneca presents "The Sound of Music" - music by Richard Rogers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. Appalachian State shocks number 5-ranked Michigan, 34-32. They're partying tonight in Boone! Michigan subsequently falls out of the AP and CNN polls' Top 25. According to an Ohio State fan on September 8, "the Appalachian State merchandise is flying off the shelves in Columbus." How many batteries does it take to beat a Wolverine? - Just one double A."
  • September 2: For the first time, the First Friday parade becomes the First Sunday parade. The parade begins at 5:00 pm and the theme of the parade is "Reigning Over the Sunshine State." Grand marshall is Clemson football star Jeff Davis. Clemson will go coastal with beach music at Tiger Shag 2007. The show will feature General Johnson and the Chairmen of the Board, Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs, the East Coast Band and the Out of Towners playing classic beach music. There will be games, prizes, rides, food and beverage and music. Gates will open at 2 p.m., and the show will begin at 4 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance and are now on sale at the Littlejohn Coliseum box office, at TicketMaster outlets and online at www.ticketmaster.com. Tickets the day of the show will be $15. The first 500 people to buy tickets for Tiger Shag at the Littlejohn box office will receive a free Tiger Shag T-shirt. Lawn chairs and blankets are permitted at both shows, but coolers and outside food and drinks are not allowed. The Greenville News reports this date that former Clemson defensive backs C.J. Gaddis, Duane Coleman and Jamaal Fudge were among cuts by the Philadelphia Eagles, Indianapolis Colts and Jacksonville Jaguars, respectively. Also former Clemson linebacker John Leake was cut by the Atlanta Falcons. (Page 2C).
  • September 3: Bomb threat forces evacuation of Sirrine Hall. No bomb is found, but backpacks are not permitted into Memorial Stadium for the football game amidst heightened security. Threats have reportedly been received over the internet. Clemson opens the season, playing nineteenth-ranked FSU in Death Valley on Labor Day night at 8 p.m., televised nationally on ESPN. Clemson prevails over FSU, 24-18. Tiger Band debuts new pregame show with entrance from the tunnels in the West Endzone. Mac's Drive-In is featured during the broadcast.
  • September 4: Either unlimited optimism about the football season ensues, OR much rending of one's garment and gnashing of teeth... Fortunately, with a win, Clemson is ranked 25th in the Associated Press poll, and 26th in the CNN/USA Today poll.
  • September 6: Clifton S.M. “Chip” Egan has been named interim dean for Clemson University’s College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. He will serve a two-year term while the university conducts a national search for a permanent dean. Egan built his academic reputation through the performing arts, but his long association with Clemson University includes numerous leadership positions and cross-disciplinary projects. Hired in 1976 as an assistant professor in the English department’s theater program, Egan chaired the performing arts department for nine years. He also served as interim chairman for the department of communication studies and the English department. Egan retired in 2004 and spent two years on the road pursuing a career in free-lance theater. The adventure took Egan around the country, but Clemson lured him back last fall to serve a year as interim chairman for the English department. Egan said he hopes to use his term to position the college for a successful search for a permanent dean. “The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is at the very core of Clemson’s dramatic rise in quality and stature,” he said. “Our college generates many of the most creative initiatives on the campus and establishes much of Clemson’s intellectual climate. I am honored to serve as interim dean.” University President James F. Barker said, "Chip Egan is an outstanding teacher and leader at Clemson. His skills in collaboration will serve the College and its professions well." Egan takes over the job held for the last six years by Janice Schach, who resigned in August to return to a full-time faculty position.
  • September 7: Corey Smith performs on the lawn at Littlejohn Coliseum, 8 p.m. Florez-Acoustic opens. Judge Edward Miller denies proposal by Jerry Buck Inman's lawyer James Bannister that he be allowed to enter a guilty plea in the murder case of Tiffany Marie Souers before the judge, and then be sentenced by a jury to either life in prison without parole, or death by lethal injection. The judge cites state law that prohibits such an arrangement. The Tiger reports on this development on page one of the September 21 issue, Volume 101, issue 15, in an article by staff writer Cohen Simpson.
  • September 7-September 9: The Clemson Little Theatre presents "The Foreigner", a play by Larry Shue, in which the mysteries unfold in this funny yet cryptic trek amongst the Georgia pines. This is the first performance of the Clemson Little Theatre's 2007-2008 season. Pat Shull directs.
  • September 8: Clemson hosts Louisiana-Monroe in Death Valley. Hall of Fame. Kick-off at 1 p.m. Tigers defeat the Warhawks, 49-26.
  • September 10: Clemson rises to 20th in both the Associated Press and CNN/USA Today polls.
  • September 11: The Boni Belle Brooks Series presents the sixteen-member Vanguard Jazz Orchestra in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Admission is $25 for adults, $15 for students.
  • September 12: The ClemsonWiki main page tallies 32,000th hit.
  • September 14: Jo Dee Messina performs live on the lawn at Littlejohn Coliseum at 7 p.m. Clemson's own Lee Brice opens the show. The Oconee Community Theatre in Seneca presents "The Sound of Music" - music by Richard Rogers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. For information, call 864-882-1910.
  • September 14-September 16: The Clemson Little Theatre presents "The Foreigner", a play by Larry Shue, in which the mysteries unfold in this funny yet cryptic trek amongst the Georgia pines. This is the first performance of the Clemson Little Theatre's 2007-2008 season. Pat Shull directs.
  • September 15: Clemson hosts the Furman Paladins in Death Valley, 1 p.m. Tigers win, 38-10. Furman's last victory came in 1936 in a match played on Riggs Field in snow. The Tigers win the next 29. "We won. That's not something Lloyd Carr can say." said Tommy Bowden, quoted in the Washington Post on Sunday, September 16, (page D-11), referring to Michigan's 38-35 upset by Appalachian State. Furman and App State both play in the Southern Conference. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zp5zVpwxkdU&feature=related
  • September 17: The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a Greenville native, makes a stop at Clemson during a twelve-county tour, as part of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition's Voter Education Tour for Jobs, Peace and Justice. "The Tiger" reported on September 21 that Jonathon Richardson, Basileus of the Chi Zeta Chapter of Omega Psi Phi, introduced the Rev. Jackson, and high-lighted his notable accomplishments.
  • September 17: Clemson rises to fifteenth in the Associated Press poll, and is tied with the University of Stupid Chickens at fourteenth in the CNN/USA Today coaches poll.
  • September 18: Presented by the Utsey Chamber Series Endowment, the Daedalus Quartet with clarinetist Alexander Fiterstein, perform in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m., free admission.
  • September 18: Nine houses will be moved from Clemson University’s Douthit Hills apartment complex, which was closed last year. The houses have been purchased by Dan Ward House Movers of Six Mile, which will sell the houses. Moving the houses not only will save the university money but also will keep materials from the houses out of landfills. “This is a win-win situation for everyone: for Clemson, for the environment and for Dan Ward, ” said Gary Gaulin, associate director of residential facilities projects. The houses were donated to the university in 1967 by the Gerrish Milliken plant in Pendleton. They were moved into the Douthit Hills area and originally were used as faculty housing.
  • September 19-September 20: Career fair held at Littlejohn Coliseum.
  • September 20: Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at La France Elementary School, 6:00 p.m.
  • September 20: The Clemson - Virginia Tech football game scheduled for October 6 at Clemson Memorial Stadium is sold out. Clemson Ticket Manager Travis Furbee made the announcement on Thursday. It is the second sellout so far this year. Clemson's opener with Florida State sold out in the summer. Kickoff time for the Virginia Tech game should be announced on Monday, September 24. Tickets remain for Clemson's Homecoming game with Central Michigan on October 20 and November games with Wake Forest (November 10) and Boston College (November 17). The official seating capacity for Clemson Memorial Stadium is now 81,750.
  • September 21: The Family Series presents "A Year with Frog and Toad" in the Brooks Center at 7 p.m. A hit on Broadway, "A Year with Frog and Toad" was nominated for three Tony Awards, including "Best Musical." Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating. The ARTS Center, 212 Butler Street, Clemson, presents over 50 works of many local artists at the Arts About Gala Art Auction. The auction includes snacks and beverages, and begins at 7 p.m. There is an admission charge. Go to http://www.explorearts.org/ or call 864-633-5051 for more information.
  • September 21: The 20th-ranked Clemson women's soccer team upset seventh-ranked South Carolina by a score of 1-0 on Friday night at Riggs Field. With the win, the Lady Tigers improve to 6-1 on the season, while the Gamecocks suffered their first loss of the season falling to 7-1. The win was the first over a top-10 team for the Lady Tigers since October 15, 2006, when Clemson won a 2-1 decision over #9 Wake Forest at Riggs Field. It was the seventh victory over a top-10 team for Head Coach Todd Bramble. The Lady Tigers took five shots to the Gamecocks' 10 and Clemson had five corner kicks while South Carolina took eight in the match. Lady Tiger goalkeeper Ashley Phillips recorded three saves and posted her third solo shut out of the season. Phillips has still only allowed one goal in over 470 minutes of play this season. The match between the in-state rivals remained scoreless until the 72nd minute, when Clemson's Molly Franklin scored what proved to be the game-winner. It was the second goal of the season for the sophomore midfielder. The play began when sophomore Lindsey Jackson passed the ball from the top of the box out to sophomore Lily Boleyn on the left side of the goal. Boleyn then sent the ball back in to Franklin, who was waiting in front of the goal. Franklin nailed the eight-yard shot past Gamecock goalkeeper Lindsay Thorstenson. "This is one of the first games that I feel good about the result and also about how we performed," said Head Coach Todd Bramble. "South Carolina has a very good team this year and this was a tough game. We had contributions from a lot of people tonight. Some players who haven't gotten a lot of playing time really stepped up for us and it was great to see that." The Lady Tigers will be back in action on Sunday afternoon as they play host to Wofford at Riggs Field. The match between the Lady Tigers and the Terriers will begin at 2:00 p.m.
  • September 22: Clemson plays at N.C. State in Raleigh. Tigers win over Wolfpack, 42-20.
  • September 23: Music in the Air V - University carillonneur Linda Dzuris rings in autumn with a concert on the 47-bell carillon housed in the tower of Tillman Hall at 5 p.m. Bring a picnic and enjoy the music. Recommended listening spots include Cox Union Plaza, Military Heritage Plaza, Bowman Field, and the Carillon Garden. The concert will take place rain or shine. Visitors are invited to tour the playing cabin following the performance. Bob Dylan and Elvis Costello in Littlejohn Coliseum, 8 p.m. - tix run $37 to $67. Opening act is Amos Lee.
  • September 24: Clemson is ranked thirteenth by the Associated Press, the CNN/USA Today Coaches poll and by the first Harris poll of the season. Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at Clemson Elementary School, 6:15 p.m.
  • September 25: 12th Annual Congressional Reception - the Washington, D.C. area Clemson Club sponsors gathering in the Rayburn Office Building on Capitol Hill, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Clemson President Barker, the South Carolina Congressional delegation and special guests meet and greet alumni and friends. Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at Central Elementary School, 6:30 p.m.
  • September 26: The ClemsonWiki project's Main Page tallies its 33,000th hit.
  • September 27: The annual Miss Homecoming Pageant is held. Students can vote on-line on October 16 and October 17 for the finalists.
  • September 28: Clemson Community Care (CCC) will hold a Volunteer Appreciation lunch party at 11:30 at the CCC Center at 105 Anderson Highway near CVS and the Ramada Inn. Present and potential volunteers are invited to attend. For more information contact Joyce Fishman Klein, Volunteer Media Relations Consultant, at 864-653-4460. Deadline to RSVP as Clemson Corps Scholarship Recipients and Donors are invited by the Clemson Corps Board of Directors and the Commanders of the Army and Air Force ROTC to attend a reception two hours before the football game at the Fike Recreation Center Sun Deck. RSVP by September 28 at the Business and Behavioral Science office, G-01 Sirrine Hall, 864-656-6172, or at GEDWARD@clemson.edu.
  • September 28: Clemson vs. Duke Men's Soccer Match on Friday is Solid Orange Event. The Clemson men's soccer team will play host to Duke University on Friday, September 28th, at 8:00 p.m. This match is designated as a Solid Orange event. Tickets for adults are $8, youth are $6 and Clemson Faculty/Staff are $2. Clemson students are free with a valid ID. Tigers go down, 2-4.
  • September 29: Clemson plays at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. The Tigers cannot execute at all, and amazingly, only lose 3-13. Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure held in Greenville at the CU-ICAR & Millenium Campuses; survivor breakfast celebration at 7:30 a.m., one-mile family walk at 9:15 a.m., and 5K Run/Walk at 9:30 a.m. Register on-line at http://www.komenupstatesc.org/. Phone - 864-234-5035.
  • September 29-September 30: The Clemson Players present Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre in the Bellamy Theatre of the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating.
  • September 30: Clemson vs. Boston College Women's Soccer Match on Sunday is Solid Orange Event. The Clemson women's soccer team plays host to Boston College on Sunday, September 30th, at 1:00 p.m. Admission is free. The 14th-ranked Clemson women's soccer team played eighth-ranked Boston College to a 0-0 tie on Sunday afternoon at Riggs Field. The tie brings the Lady Tigers' record to 8-1-1 overall and 1-0-1 in the Atlantic Coast Conference, while the Eagles are now 7-0-2 on the season (0-0-1 ACC).

October[edit]

  • October 1: After doing just about everything wrong in loss to Georgia Tech, Clemson falls to 22nd in all three major polls.
  • October 1: School District Pickens County first grade period interim reports due. Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at Palmetto Elementary School, 6:30 p.m. Miami-based Tiempo Libre brings its fiery, passionate performances of timba, "an irresistable, dance-inducing combination of jazz and salsa", to the Brooks Center as part of the Boni Belle Brooks Series. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students. Performance at 8 p.m.
  • October 1-October 5: The Clemson Players present "Jane Eyre" in the Bellamy Theatre of the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Tix are $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating.
  • October 2: Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at Cedar Grove Elementary School, 6:30 p.m., and Iva Elementary School, 6:30 p.m. For more information Karel Reed 864-297-5890 or 864-646-8680.
  • October 3: Clemson's football program has the third best graduation success rate among the top 25 teams in this week's Coaches poll according to USA Today. The 2007 graduation success rate figures for all schools were released on October 3 and the publication reclassified the list according to graduation rate. Boston College, also from the ACC, had a 93 percent rate to rank first, while Nebraska was second at 83 percent. Clemson was third at 75 percent, followed by Florida and Virginia Tech, Clemson's opponent on Saturday, at 72 percent. The graduation success rate does not take into account student-athletes who transfer or turn professional in good academic standing. The current study examined student-athletes who entered school between 1997-00 and gives the student-athletes six years to graduate.
  • October 4: The City of Clemson is asking for voluntary water conservation measures throughout our system. While we still have a more than adequate water level above the low water intake at our treatment plant on Lake Hartwell, the Utilities Department is asking consumers to use water wisely before the situation becomes critical. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has declared an extreme drought in our area of the state and the Utilities Department feels all water providers should cooperate with statewide efforts to conserve water. We urge our customers to help us avoid a more serious situation by voluntarily curtailing non essential water use and by using water wisely. Suggestions for saving water include:
  • Verify your home is leak free. Check your meter when no water is being used, if the meter is turning check your toilets, faucets, etc. for leaks.
  • Take shorter showers and replace shower heads with low flow models.
  • Operate dishwashers and clothes washers only when they are full.
  • Don’t let water run while shaving, washing your face or brushing your teeth.
  • Water lawns early in the morning only every 5 to 7 days. Don’t over water your lawn, and set sprinklers so they water only your vegetation, not driveways and streets. It will be beneficial if the even number houses water on even numbered days of the month and that odd numbered houses water on odd numbered days of the month.
  • Use a broom instead of water to remove debris from sidewalks and driveways.
  • October 5: An oak is planted on the lawn adjacent to Tillman Hall and Brackett Hall, commemorating the 32 victims of the shootings at Virginia Tech in April. Luke Bryan performs at Sigma Chi Derby Days. Ticket information at 864-656-1413. The Boni Belle Brooks Series presents the North Carolina Dance Theatre in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. The program showcases Alvin Ailey's Night Creature, George Balanchine's popular Who Cares?, and Twyla Tharp's Nine Sinatra Songs, set to the music of Duke Ellington, George Gershwin, and Frank Sinatra. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for students. Final show as the Clemson Players present "Jane Eyre" in the Bellamy Theatre of the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Tix are $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating.
  • October 6: The Tigers host the Virginia Tech Hokies in Death Valley. Clemson Corps Scholarship Recipients and Donors are invited by the Clemson Corps Board of Directors and the Commanders of the Army and Air Force ROTC to attend a reception two hours before the football game at the Fike Recreation Center Sun Deck. RSVP by September 28 at the Business and Behavioral Science office, G-01 Sirrine Hall, 864-656-6172, or at GEDWARD@clemson.edu. Fahmarr McElrathbey introduces the Tiger offensive and defensive lines during the ESPN broadcast of the first quarter. Calhoun Corners restaurant is featured during the broadcast. The Tigers are downed 23-41.
  • October 7: The Clemson Players present "Jane Eyre" in the Bellamy Theatre of the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Tix are $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating. Also - and probably more fun than Charlotte Bronte, John Waters' fabulous movie-turned-musical, Hairspray, comes to the Brooks Center at 3 p.m., all seats $35. If the adventures of plus-size Tracy Turnblad and her mother Edna don't cheer you up, then you have my sympathies. Based on actual Baltimore t.v. dance show history!
  • October 8: The Tigers only garner enough votes to come in at 37th in the Associated Press poll, and 38th in the USA Today/CNN Coaches poll.
  • October 9: The CU Symphony Orchestra performs in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m., featuring Concerto Winners. Works by Wagner, Elgar, and others. Tickets are $5 for adults, students free, with general seating.
  • October 11: Tiger Paw Productions presents The Newsboys in Littlejohn Coliseum with Kutless and New Worldson. Ticket information at 864-656-1413.
  • October 12: Come celebrate Clemson Mayor Abernathy's 60th birthday at Catherine Smith Plaza, 5:30-7:30 p.m. (or at the Ramada Inn in case of rain). No gifts - a donation to the Clemson Free Clinic and Clemson Community Care is suggested.
  • October 13: Clemson plays Open Date College. Clemson Downs Volunteers Fashion Show is held to benefit the Certified Nursing Assistant Program at Tri County Tech, at 2:45 pm in the Family Life Center, First Baptist Church on College Avenue in Clemson. Tickets are $10.00, available at the First Citizen's Bank, Clemson, and the Clemson Downs Office. For more information call 864-654-9390 or 864-653-8742.
  • October 14: The Clemson Wiki project Main Page tallies its 34,000th hit.
  • October 15: Doug Hallenbeck takes over as the new executive director of housing at Clemson University.
  • October 17: The 8th annual Pickens County Health & Fitness Fair will be held at the Central/Clemson Recreation Center, located behind Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home on Highway 93 in Central, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., sponsored by Cannon Memorial Hospital Wellness Center, Central, the Clemson Recreation Center in Central, the Central Recreation Department, and the City of Clemson Recreation Department.
  • October 20: For Homecoming, Clemson hosts Central Michigan. Alumni Band celebrates Silver Anniversary. Tigers 70, Chippewas 14.
  • October 25: Wonny Song, pianist, presented by the Utsey Chamber Series Endowment, at 8 p.m. in the Brooks Center. Free admission. "As a winner of the 2005 Young Concert Artists International Auditions in New York, Korean-Canadian pianist Wonny Song made his recital debuts at Carnegie's Zankel Hall in New York and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.c.. Other notable prizes include the 2003 Prix d'Europe in Canada, the 2001 Ludmila Knezkova Piano Competition in Nova Scotia, First Prize and Best Artistic Interpretation Prize at the 1995 Montreal Symphony Piano Competition, and a Gold Medal at the 1994 World Piano Competition in Cincinnati. Mr. Song's first CD, a recording of Rachmaninoff's Variations on a Theme of Corelli, was a bestseller in Canada." (Brooks Center 2007-2008 Calendar)
  • October 27: Clemson plays at Maryland in College Park, beating the Terps, 30-17.
  • October 28: An early morning fire in a private beach house in Belle Isle Beach, North Carolina, kills seven students, six from the University of South Carolina and one from Clemson University. Victims were members of Delta Delta Delta sorority and Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, and several were from the Upstate. Victims identities will be released later in the week.
  • October 29: Clemson University President James F. Barker Monday issued a statement regarding the deaths of seven students in a North Carolina fire. “As the Clemson Family mourns the loss of one of our students we reach out to our sister institution, the University of South Carolina, in their loss,” he said. “In our state all of us are connected and we feel their loss as they feel our loss. Our deepest sympathies are felt for the families of these seven students. We are working with our students and these grieving families to help them in the difficult days ahead.” Clemson has not received confirmation of the identity of the students who were killed in the fire at a home at Ocean Isle Beach, N.C., Sunday morning. Counselors have been offering their support to students since news of the fire reached the campus. The University of South Carolina will hold a "grieving session" at 6 p.m. Monday in the ballroom of the Russell House University Union to mourn the victims of a fire Sunday in North Carolina. Clemson reappears in the rankings after a victory over Maryland, 25th in the Associated Press, and 24th in the CNN/USA Today Coaches poll.
  • October 30: Clemson University sophomore Emily Yelton, was one of the victims of the weekend fire in North Carolina. Emily, who is survived by an identical twin, Meredith, also a Clemson student, was at the beach house with friends she had gone to school with at J.L. Mann High who are now students at the University of South Carolina, her mother, Kim Yelton, said. "She was a ray of sunshine. She was fun. She was larger than life. She never met a stranger," her mother said. Emily, who turned 19 in August, was in the process of changing her major from marketing to early childhood education because of her love for children, according to her mother. She had been a volunteer swim coach and often took kids from her neighborhood in Simpsonville to the movies. (Data from article by Greenville News staff writer Ron Barnett.) The other victims have been identified by ABC News as Justin Anderson, Travis Cale, Lauren Mahon, Cassidy Pendely, William Rhea and Allison Walden. http://www.abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=3793885&page=1 Clemson will hold a memorial service for Taylor A. Cox, a 19-year-old student who died Oct. 11 after collapsing before a flag football game on campus. He was a sophomore civil engineering major from Lexington. The service will be held at 5 p.m. in Brackett Hall auditorium, followed by a wreath presentation on the Military Heritage Plaza, adjacent to Tillman Hall. For details, contact Rusty Guill (656-0935) or Angela Nixon in News Services (656-0382). Women's Volleyball, a Solid Orange Event, Clemson Tigers vs. Georgia Tech at 7:00 p.m. in Jervey Gym. Admission is free for all fans and T-shirts will be given away throughout the match. A Halloween costume contest will also be held during the intermission between the second and third match, with the best costumes receiving prizes. Currently, the Tigers are in first place in ACC play with a perfect record of 13-0, and have improved their overall record to 20-2. Clemson swept both of their matches this past weekend to extend their winning streak to 16 straight matches. The Brooks Center Family Series presents "The Velveteen Rabbit", Margery Williams' famous and much-loved literary classic, performed by the Enchantment Theatre Company, with the musical talents of award-winning composer/arranger Don Sebesky with an original score. Show at 7 p.m., $6 for adults, $3 for students, general seating.

November[edit]

  • November 3: Clemson plays at Duke in Durham. The 25th-ranked Tigers win, 47-10. Tiger Paw Productions presents Three Days Grace in Littlejohn Coliseum with Breaking Benjamin. Ticket information at 864-656-1413.
  • November 6: The Clemson University Jazz Ensemble performs big band and small group arrangements of jazz standards from the 1930s to the present in the Brooks Center. Performance at 8 p.m., free admission.
  • November 9: The Department of Performing Arts celebrates the life of Thomas Green Clemson in a special event in the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Featuring music, poetry, and dramatic vignettes, this kaleidoscopic multi-media concert showcases faculty and students in a depiction of Clemson's life. All proceeds benefit the Department of Performing Arts scholarship fund. $12 for adults, $5 for students.
  • November 10: Clemson hosts Wake Forest in Death Valley. The Tigers defeat the 22nd-ranked Demon Deacons, 44-10, the first ever sell-out for a Wake appearance in Memorial Stadium. With Maryland upsetting Boston College, 42-34, in Byrd Stadium, evening the Eagles with the Tigers at two division losses, the Tigers' fate is in their own hands on November 17. But it will not come to pass, dammit!
  • November 12: Clemson is ranked fifteenth in the Associated Press poll and BCS rankings, and sixteenth in the USA Today and Harris Interactive polls.
  • November 12-November 16: MFA Thesis Exhibition, "Meanwhile, a few inches apart", Molly Morin, Elizabeth Snipes, Jillian Ludwig, at Lee Gallery, Lee Hall, with artists' reception on November 16, 7-9 p.m.
  • November 13: Both Clemson and the University of South Carolina announce that the annual effigy burning pep rallies normally held prior to the meeting of the arch-rivals will be cancelled this year as inappropriate so soon after the tragic Ocean Isle Beach fire. The Clemson University Choral Ensembles present selections from the traditional choral repertoire. Women's Glee, Men's Glee, and the Clemson University Singers perform at 8 p.m. in the Brooks Center. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for students, general seating.
  • November 17: Clemson hosts Boston College in Death Valley. The Eagles defeat the Tigers, 17-20, dashing the Clemson hopes for an ACC title - again. The last one came in 1991.
  • November 20: Christine Todd Whitman, co-chair of the Clean and Safe Energy Coalition and former governor of New Jersey, speaks at Self Auditorium, Strom Thurmond Institute at 9:30 a.m. The program is free and open to the public. Ms. Whitman's visit to Clemson is sponsored by the Office of Research and Economic Development. For more information contact the Strom Thurmond Institute at 864-656-4700.
  • November 24: Clemson meets South Carolina in Williams-Brice Stadium on Thanksgiving weekend. The Tigers defeat the Gamecocks, 23-21, on the final play of the game, in Columbia.
  • November 27: The possibility of reducing the influence of money on politics is discussion topic at a meeting of the League of Women Voters Clemson Area (LWVCA) at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Clemson, 226 Pendleton Road, Clemson, at 7:30 p.m. For more information call 864-885-1967.
  • November 29: A letter from Athletic Director Terry Don Phillips:
Dear Clemson,
We were all pleased with the outcome of last Saturday night's victory in Columbia. The support of our fans at the game was tremendous, as it has been all season. Our average home attendance this year was among the best in school history and the support of our fans for road games certainly contributed to the 4-1 road record, the best road record for the program in 10 years.
In this column and other initiatives, we have discussed the importance of good sportsmanship at all of our athletic events, home and away. From what I saw, that was the case at Saturday's game in Columbia. We have made great strides by demonstrating good sportsmanship, especially in our competitions with the University of South Carolina.
However, I must say that I was disappointed on Tuesday when I learned of a billboard on I-26 in Columbia that displays the final score and other remarks.
We do not condone the exhibition of this billboard. It steps over the line and I am personally disappointed that it has been displayed. And, I would ask those that are responsible to have it removed.
How we handle our success and adversity needs to always reflect the character and dignity of our great University.
Terry Don Phillips
Yesterday I sent an e-mail and posted on our web site my expression that we
did not condone the billboard on I-26 in Columbia. There has been reaction
on both sides of this issue. While I still hold the basic opinion that was
expressed, I should have stated that I recognize that in a rivalry such as
this--both sides, whenever the opportunity presents itself, are going to
take shots at one another. And, not necessarily because of poor
sportsmanship-but, rather, that's the nature of the rivalry. Accordingly, I
do owe a public apology to the Jackson family and to those that took
offense. Even though I stand by my initial reasoning regarding
sportsmanship issues, I recognize that my action was a mistake in how I
handled this issue as well as the wording of the message.
Again, my apology. Terry Don Phillips

December[edit]

  • December 1: The Tiger basketball team downs the Gamecocks, 85-74, in Littlejohn Coliseum. K.C. Rivers scored 24 points and had eight rebounds to lead the No. 18-ranked Tigers. Rivers stopped a couple of runs by South Carolina (4-4) in the second half with key shots, helping Clemson win their seventh consecutive game to start a season for the third straight time.
  • December 3: Clemson is ranked fifteenth by the Associated Press poll, and sixteenth in the USA Today and Harris Interactive polls. The Tigers are also fifteenth in the BCS rankings.
  • December 5: The 2nd annual Clemson Rave is performed on the Cooper Library Bridge.
  • December 9: Benjamin Sprague, 18, a Clemson University freshman, was found dead at the Sigma Nu house, which is located on a lake-front lot in Seneca. After the incident, vehicles were parked across the long driveway to the house, blocking any news media access. A spokeswoman from the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division said she could not comment on the report because it was an ongoing investigation. According to the Oconee County coroner, Mr. Sprague died of alcohol poisoning and had a blood alcohol level of 0.4 percent, more than five times the legal limit for an adult. The legal limit for someone under 21 is 0.02, while it is 0.08 for an adult. Mr. Sprague is the grandson of former state legislator T. Ed Garrison. Mr. Sprague’s family lives in Greenville, where he attended Greenville High School and played on the football and soccer teams. His older brother also is a member of the fraternity.
  • December 19: Former The Tiger Editor-in-Chief Charles Bolchoz (October 1979-March 1980) is one of four victims of a blast at the T2 Laboratories plant in Jacksonville, Florida, at 1:33 p.m. this date, most severe industrial accident in nearly three years. The concussion of the explosion was felt for several miles. The explosion's force was equivalent to detonating about a ton of TNT and it spread debris up to a mile from the plant. Some 14 others were injured at the chemical facility where gasoline additives are produced, amongst other products. T2 Laboratories' chemical reactor ruptured, according to a preliminary investigation by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board.[5] The investigators reported their belief that the reactor ruptured during the production of a gasoline additive. Following the explosion, every hazardous-materials unit in Jacksonville and over 100 firefighters fought the ensuing blaze, which a spokesman termed a "hellish inferno". T2 Laboratories' chemical reactor ruptured, according to a preliminary investigation by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board. The investigators reported their belief that the reactor ruptured during the production of a gasoline additive. Bolchoz, 48, was the head chemical engineer. His body was recovered on December 20. A memorial service was held in Jacksonville on December 26, with his funeral in Charleston, S.C., December 29. Chaz had attended the Centennial reunion of The Tiger in March 2007, and as was appropriate, the Senior Staff from that era adjourned downtown to the Sloan Street Tap-Room to hold a "Tuesday Night editorial board", just as we did that first fall of 1979 when Jimmy Howard had just opened his place. Little did we suspect that that would be our last pitcher of Blatz with Charles.
  • December 19: Food Lion opens new store at 107 Canoy Lane, Clemson. Tiger Card accepted.
  • December 20: Graduation held, including Andrea Moss.
  • December 28: Final day of business for Campus Camera after 33 years.


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