October 1

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October 1 in Clemson History

  • 1873: A second auction sale of properties is held in the new town of Seneca City.
  • 1906: Coach Bob Williams arrives at Clemson for the first time.
  • 1910: In first meeting with Mercer, Clemson loses home game, 0-3.
  • 1912: The Tiger publishes a cartoon (Volume VIII, Number 1) showing an upperclassman offering a Rat a ticket to admit him to the student body - only $2!
  • 1915: Drill held. Palmetto, Calhoun, Columbian, Wade Hampton, Hayne and Carolina Literary Societies meet at 7:35 p.m. Football practice (light) held. (The Tiger, "Weekly Calendar'", Tuesday 28 September 1915, Volume XI, Number 2, page 2.)
  • 1918: The Students' Army Training Corps, a short-lived military training program, is set up by the War Department during the latter portion of the Great War after the United States had joined in the conflict. From The Tiger, October 9, 1918, Volume XIV, Number 2 (page 1): S. A. T. C. SOLDIERS HEAR GOV. MANNING
Very appropriate exercises were held at 12 noon on Tuesday, October 1st, the date set aside for the induction of men into the S. A. T. C. Governor Richard I. Manning was the speaker of the occasion.
The corps numbering between 900 and 1000 were brought together in mass formation around the stand where Governor Manning, President Riggs, Colonel McFeeley, aand [sic] two members of the Local Board of Oconee were seated. The corps stood at salute while the flag was raised and the buglers sounded "To the Colors." Colonel McFeeley administered the oath of allegiance to the flag and then read the following messages:
MESSAGE OF HON. BENEDICT CROWELL
ACTING SECRETARY OF WAR
As college students you are accustomed to contests of physical force. You are familiar with the tedious training and self-sacrificing discipline that are required to develop a team that can win the game. You know that the contest is won by team work, push, enthusiastic cooperation with one another and coordination of every individual talent to the single purpose of common success.
In the military struggle in which you are about to enter, the same conditions prevail. In order to succeed, many weeks of thorough going training and drill are essential to develop the coordination of skill and imagination that is essential to achieve the vast and vital end to which the country has pledged its every effort. The fighting machine will come into effective working order more rapidly in proportion as each individual in it devotes his full attention to the particular service for which he is best qualified. In entering upon this training as student soldiers you have the opportunity of developing your abilities to the point where they wiill be most effective in the common struggle. I am sure that you will do this in the same spirit and with the same enthusiasm that you have always exhibited in the lesser struggles to which you have been accustomed to devote your energies. I am sure you will rise to this opportunity and show that America, the home of the pioneer, the inventor, and the master of machines, is ready and able to turn its every energy to the construction of an all powerful military machine, which will prove as effective in liberating men as have the reaper, the aeroplane, and the telephone.
MESSAGE OF GENERAL MARCH
CHIEF OF STAFF
The Students' Army Training Corps has been organized to aassist [sic] in training a body of men from whom the United States will draw officer material in large numbers. The need for these officers is one of the most imperative connected with our large army program, and patriotic young men will be given an apportunity [sic] to acquire this training with the knowledge that they will thus be enabled to better serve their Country in the great drive which is to come. Superior leadership spells success in war, and it is the duty of every member of the Student Officers' Training Corps to do his utmost to qualify as a leader of men.
PEYTON C. MARCH
General, Chief of Staff, U. S. A.
  • 1920: Clemson plays Presbyterian to a 7-7 tie on Riggs Field.
  • 1921: The Tigers open the football season with a road trip to Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, but fall, 0-14, to the Praying Colonels.
  • 1930: YMCA auditorium shows picture "Wings of Adventure", a cheap independent production about Mexican bandits on the (presumably) U.S.-Mexico border, released August 1, 1930, featuring really bad accents.
  • October 1, 1965-October 2, 1965: The Contemporary Film Series Committee presents free film, Japanese release "Ikiru".
  • 1977: Two freshmen, Jeffery Sturt and Susan Strickland, are killed when the 1971 Opel GT driven by Sturt leaves S.C. Highway 183 about three miles north of Walhalla about 4 a.m. and goes down embankment and strikes tree, killing both instantly. The wreck is discovered by another motorist about 6:20 p.m.
  • 2006: Following the 51-0 shut-out of the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs on September 30, the Clemson Tigers rise to 15th in the Associated Press, USA Today/CNN Coaches and Harris Interactive polls. Former ACC leader Virginia Tech falls to 21st in the AP poll, 18th in the USA Today/CNN poll, and 19th in the Harris poll after a 38-27 upset by Georgia Tech. Georgia Tech's Yellowjackets rise to 18th in the AP, and 20th in the CNN and Harris polls. Florida State is 17th in the AP and Harris polls, and 16th in the CNN poll. Boston College drops out of the top 25 in the CNN poll (they rank 26th), and hangs on at 25th in the AP and Harris polls.
  • 2007: School District Pickens County first grade period interim reports due. Girl Scout Membership Recruitment for girls ages 5-17 and a parent/guardian at Palmetto Elementary School, 6:30 p.m. Miami-based Tiempo Libre brings its fiery, passionate performances of timba, "an irresistable, dance-inducing combination of jazz and salsa", to the Brooks Center as part of the Boni Belle Brooks Series. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students. Performance at 8 p.m.
  • 2007: After doing just about everything wrong in loss to Georgia Tech, Clemson falls to 22nd in all three major polls.
  • 2007-First night of five perfomances by the Clemson Players of "Jane Eyre" in the Bellamy Theatre of the Brooks Center at 8 p.m. Tix are $10 for adults, $5 for students, general seating.
  • 2009: The Tiger Band pep band departs campus on two charter buses at 1 p.m. With a redesign and down-sized format, the former Seneca Journal, now just The Journal, also retires the Messenger name for the Clemson and Pendleton paper, ending a historic masthead that dates to 1807, a 202-year history. Previously published with two different front pages, the revamped look will serve all communities with the single name.


September 30 October October 2