1946

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Events that occurred in 1946 in Clemson history

  • January 14: Control of the U.S.A.A.F. Issaqueena Bombing Range is transferred from Greenville AAB, later Donaldson AFB, to Shaw Field, later Shaw AFB, Sumter, S.C.
  • Pershing Rifles Regimental Headquarters is chartered on March 19, 1946. This regiment, located at Clemson University, is the largest of all nine. It has more than 26 units from seven different states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. This regiment also has companies in Puerto Rico.
  • March 22: The Tiger reports that new professors have joined the faculty in recent months, including: Marshall C. Bell, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, first came to Clemson in 1936, left for the Navy, July 1942, Lieutenant when discharged, married with two children; D. W. Bradbury, Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing, left Clemson in February 1942, Captain in the Army when discharged, lives in Seneca; Dr. J. T. Kroulik, Bacteriology, M. A. from Texas and Ph. D. from Kansas State, at Clemson for one year, served in Army Sanitation and Bacteriology Division, Captain when discharged; A. D. Lewis, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, returned in February, has been doing graduate work and some teaching at Yale, received M. A. at Yale this February; W. Gilbert Miller, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, left Clemson for the Navy in 1943, was Lieutenant when discharged, married; J. H. Sams, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, first came to Clemson in 1927, went in Army as a Captain in June 1941, was a Colonel when discharged, married; W. M. Wachter, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, was a Captain in Army when discharged, married with one child. (The Tiger, "Profs Return To Campus", Friday 22 March 1946, Volume XXXIX, Number 32, page 1.)
  • March 29: Erskine plays Clemson in baseball at Clemson.
  • April 1: The Tiger ("The World's Most Uninteresting College Rag") publishes April Fools' issue (Volume XXXIX, Number 32a) - headlined "Shorty Is New President" with sub-head "Oscar is found dead in Latrine".
  • April 5: Georgia comes to Clemson for baseball game.
  • April 6: Clemson travels to Georgia for baseball game.
  • April 9: Davidson plays Clemson at Clemson in baseball.
  • April 12: Clemson travels to Athens to play Georgia in baseball.
  • April 13: Clemson plays Georgia in baseball at Thomaston, Georgia.
  • April 19: Presbyterian College travels to Clemson for baseball game.
  • April 20: Clemson plays Newberry College in baseball at Newberry.
  • April 23: Clemson plays baseball with Furman at Greenville.
  • April 26: Clemson plays baseball with South Carolina in Columbia.
  • April 27: Clemson plays Erskine in baseball at Due West.
  • April 30: Clemson plays Wofford in baseball at Spartanburg.
  • May: Most of the structures and military property of the Issaqueena Bombing Range are removed by this time.
  • May 3: Clemson plays Presbyterian College in baseball at Clinton.
  • May 4: Newberry plays Clemson in baseball at Clemson.
  • May 7: Wofford plays baseball with Clemson at Clemson.
  • May 11: Clemson travels to Davidson College for baseball.
  • May 13: Clemson hosts Furman for baseball game.
  • May 18: Clemson hosts South Carolina in baseball.
  • Summer: The first Pre-fabs, pre-fabricated buildings, go up on campus, in two styles, the single-family United Kingdom type, and a two-family model. These are needed to accomodate the crush of returning servicemen to school after their military duty in World War II. Fall enrollment for the 1946-1947 year sets a new record of 2,750, up from 2,300 in 1940-1941.
  • July: The Board of Trustees meets and bestows names on many campus sites. Morrison Road is named for William S. Morrison, the first professor of history at Clemson. Colonial Circle in front of the Hanover House is named, The Tiger reports in the July 12, 1946 edition. Further, the Main Building will now be named Tillman Hall for Benjamin Ryan Tillman, South Carolina governor, United States senator and life trustee of the college. Barracks No. 1 is named Simpson Hall in honor of Richard W. Simpson, the man who drew up the Thomas G. Clemson will and who served as the first chairman of the Board of Trustees. Barracks No. 2 is now named Johnstone Hall for State Senator Alan McCrary Johnstone of Newberry, Clemson Class of 1932.
  • August: The new TAPS staff announces that the 1947 edition is in danger of not being produced as only 350 cadets have scheduled portraits, 35 percent of the student body. This will be the first yearbook at Clemson since wartime circumstances caused it to lapse for three years, the last printed in 1943.
  • August 8: President Robert Franklin Poole announces receipt by the college of a $30,000 grant from the General Education Board of the Rockefeller Foundation, to be dispensed over a three-year period.
  • August 10: The Chemistry Building (later named Hardin Hall) burns at dusk and the gabled roof is replaced with a flat one during rebuilding in the fall. This editor's father missed the excitement due to being laid up in the infirmary with a stomach bug.
  • August 23: The Jungaleers perform at a dance in Anderson.
  • August 30: CDA holds "Summer Finals" dances over two-day period. Friday night's affair in the Field House is semi-formal, $2.25 per couple, music by The Jungaleers, under the leadership of "Willie" Whisnant. Dates are quartered in the Physics Building, with city residents, and in some of the newly-erected G.I. pre-fab housing.
  • August 31: The Saturday night "Summer Finals" dance in the Field House is informal, $2 per couple, with music by Clemson's own Jungaleers. Coat check handled by the Block C Club with concessions operated by the Clemson Athletic Association.
  • Fall: William Bryan Keller takes over Judge Keller's Store from his father, founder Isaac Leonard Keller.
  • Fall: Professor Hugh H. McGarity joins faculty at Clemson as Associate Professor of Music, the first to hold this post in several years. A graduate of the University of Georgia in 1940 with a Bachelors in Music, with his Masters conferred in the summer of 1946. He will conduct the college band, coordinate all musical activities, and it is hoped that a student choir can be organized.
  • September 21: Perennial opening game fodder, Presbyterian comes to Clemson for a 39-0 spank.
  • September 27: The Tigers lose night game at Georgia, 12-35.
  • October 5: Clemson loses at home to N.C. State, 7-14.
  • October 7: TAPS photos begin to be taken, after additional cadets signed up for portraits.
  • October 12: Clemson is defeated by Wake Forest in road game, 7-19.
  • October 15: Sixty cadets turn out in the college auditorium (Tillman Auditorium) this night to reestablish a Glee Club after a three-year lapse.
  • October 23: The Jungaleers play at a pre-Carolina game dance at the Columbia Township Auditorium, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., with admission $1.50 per person or $2.75 per couple, as reported in The Tiger, October 21, 1946, (Volume XXXIX, Number 39).
  • October 24: The Tigers lose to the South Carolina Gamecocks in Columbia, 14-26. Counterfeit tickets had been printed and 10,000 more fans show up than capacity. They storm the gates and stand on the sidelines and in the end zones. Coach Howard recalled fans standing next to him telling him what plays to run.
  • October 31: The United States Navy Band performs at Clemson for the first time since 1941, in the Field House at 8 p.m., the second of five events in the Clemson Concert Series. Free admission to students, with Mu Beta Psi honorary music fraternity members as ushers.
  • November 2: Clemson wins at Virginia Tech, 14-7.
  • November 9: The Tigers take a 13-54 licking from Tulane in New Orleans.
  • November 11: Capt. John Douglas J. D. Harcombe, mess officer at Clemson for 26 years, dies at home early Monday morning, following several months of poor health, age 64. Arriving in 1920 as an experienced Army mess officer, he oversaw feeding a corps that grew from 847 to ~3,000 students.
  • November 16: Clemson defeats Furman in Memorial Stadium, 20-6.
  • November 23: Clemson beats the Auburn Tigers, 21-13, in a game played in Montgomery, Alabama, for a season record of 4-5, 2-3 in league play, for eleventh place in the Southern Conference.
  • December 6: Services are held for Clemson's 360 war dead in the Field House at 12:15 p.m.
  • December 9: World-renown violinist Fritz Kreisler performs in the college Field House.



1945 The 1940's 1947